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World recognition to Croatian architects Nikola Bašić and Marko Murtić for the project of the D-Resort Šibenik hotel

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first_imgHotel D-Resort Šibenik designed by architect Nikola Bašić (architecture) and architect Marko Murtić (interior) has been nominated for the prestigious award “The International Hotel and property award” which selects the best design solutions of world famous hotels. D ‐ Resort Mandalina Šibenik is among the 7 finalists for the award at the world level and among the 4 in Europe, in the category of hotels with less than 200 rooms.The International Hotel and property award is an award from The Design Awards, the UK’s leading design magazine, which features open voting for design professionals but also for all readers, clients and users. From “The Design awards”, they say how they areaim to provide design reviews, talent recognition and opportunity creation. They are looking for places that inspire the senses in terms of design, and the main awards ceremony will take place on Friday, 16.09. at the Cipriani Hotel in Venice.The interior of the D ‐ Resort Mandaline is a rare example of the integration of architecture and interior, which has resulted in one perfectly integrated project. The main concept was the creation of its own, modern vision of Mediterranean architecture, completely redesigned and devoid of globalization, as well as globaltrends in the hotel industry. We have created our own vision of Mediterranean architecture with a sense of heritage that dominates the views of the city of Šibenik. White cement shaped in wooden molds was used as the basic material in the construction, which also served as a sculptural element in the exterior and interior. The design elements in the interior are made of raw cut oak whose texture, warmth and color are a well thought out contrast to the concrete walls. Sculptures, ceramic walls and art canvases further emphasize to visitors the feeling of being in a truly special place. Art is an integral part of the D-Resort, and this is recognized internationally.In EMUR STUDIO for this project, furniture, lighting fixtures and carpets were designed, designed and manufactured under the common name STUFF – a brand that emphasizes the uniqueness of D-Resort. “STUFF is a superior design brand designed to equip modern tourism and institutional interiors, but also private housing. I would like to mention that STUFF is a modern, but above all functional design of wide application made of very high quality materials. Our furniture has been used to decorate the interior of the D ‐ Resort Mandalina hotel in Šibenik, and for the needs of the hotel we have designed and produced more than 30 pieces of furniture.”, Said Marko Murtić, a famous Croatian architect and interior designer, who finalized the interior with the help of fellow architect Ana Aščić. The nomination as part of “The International Hotel and property award” and the entry into the company of the world’s best hotels is a confirmation of an excellent project that has been very popular among domestic and old tourists since its opening last summer.last_img read more

Nature vs. nurture? Both are important, anthropologist argues

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first_imgEvolutionary science stresses the contributions biology makes to our behavior. Some anthropologists try to understand how societies and histories construct our identities, and others ask about how genes and the environment do the same thing. Which is the better approach? Both are needed, argues Agustin Fuentes, University of Notre Dame biological anthropologist.“Seeing bodies and evolutionary histories as things that can be measured separate from the human cultural experience is a poor approach and bad science,” Fuentes said. “Seeing cultural perceptions and the human experience as unconnected to biology and evolutionary history is equally misguided. Data from a vast array of sources tell us that we need an integrative approach to best understand what it means to become and be human.”In a forthcoming paper in the journal Current Anthropology, Fuentes builds on the extended evolutionary synthesis of biologist Kevin Laland of the University of St. Andrews and colleagues. “The extended evolutionary synthesis is basically an update of what we know about how evolution works,” Fuentes said. “Most people think ‘survival of the fittest’ is all that happens in evolution and that DNA and genes are all that really matters. Both counts are wrong. Evolution is an awesome mix of bodies, ecologies, behaviors, chemistry and history. We know more about how life works, and the range of systems that impact it, than ever before. Organisms are constructed in development, not simply ‘programmed’ to develop by genes. Things don’t ‘evolve’ to fit into environments. They co-construct and co-evolve with their environments.”Fuentes argues in the paper that anthropologists can, and should, combine evolutionary science, cultural analysis and ethnographic research.“In the extended evolutionary synthesis, what we think, feel and do can be as relevant as our DNA, the shape of our bones and the density of muscles … Many of those things are connected,” he said. “This makes evolution approaches to why humans do what they do more exciting and more accessible to a wide range of researchers, but it also makes our jobs a lot harder.“We need more collaboration across areas in anthropology, more interaction with those outside anthropology and the development of more complex, but much better, answers about being human.” Email Pinterest Share on Twittercenter_img Share on Facebook Share LinkedInlast_img read more

Flu Scan for Dec 26, 2013

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first_imgStudy finds new clues behind severe H7N9 infectionThe severity of H7N9 influenza infection is linked to high cytokine levels, and some patients appear to have a genetic marker that correlates with more serious outcomes, according to a research team from China and Australia. The group reported their findings in the Dec 23 edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).They examined cytokine and chemokine levels in plasma samples of 18 patients who were hospitalized in Shanghai with H7N9 infections. They also looked at bronchoalveolar lavage samples from three of the patients and conducted genetic sequencing tests on blood and lung samples.When they compared the clinical courses with the test results, they found that H7N9 severity was associated with higher levels of cytokines and chemokines, a pattern seen with other types of influenza infections, such as H5N1. They showed that cytokine levels were 100- to 1,000-fold higher in plasma than in lungs, and the authors said hat plasma levels may provide a “window” for assessing cytokine damage in infected lungs. The researchers also identified a genotype that related to more severe clinical outcomes: IFN-induced transmembrane protein-3 (IFITM3).Peter Doherty, PhD, laureate professor at the University of Melbourne and lead author of the study, said in a Dec 23 press release that predicting how flu affects individuals could provide keys to managing the disease and allocating health resources. “We are exploring how genetic sequencing and early identification can allow us to intervene in treating patients before they become too unwell. As new cases of influenza emerge in the Northern Hemisphere, we try to keep a season ahead and prepare to protect the most vulnerable in our community,” he said.In other developments, Hong Kong’s government today said an 80-year-old man hospitalized in early December with an H7N9 infection has died, according to a Reuters report. His case is one of two H7N9 cases recently imported into Hong Kong from the mainland city of Shenzhen and is now Hong Kong’s first fatal case. The man’s death pushes the number of fatal H7N9 cases to 48. Overall, 146 cases have been reported, all with links to mainland China, where the disease is thought to be spreading to people from infected market poultry.Dec 23 PNAS abstract Dec 23 University of Melbourne press release Dec 26 Reuters story CDC alerts health providers about H1N1 patterns, treatmentThe US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a Health Alert Network (HAN) advisory to healthcare providers on Dec 24 that said it has received a number of reports of severe respiratory infections in young and middle-aged adults, many of whom were infected with the 2009 H1N1 virus.The CDC said multiple hospitalizations and some deaths have been reported and the virus seems to be following a pattern seen during the pandemic months when it caused more illness in children and young adults. It warned that if the 2009 H1N1 virus—now considered a seasonal strain and covered in all flu vaccine formulations—continues to circulate widely, children and middle-aged adults may shoulder much of the burden.The agency reported that so far there is no sign of significantly increased virulence or transmissibility, but the CDC will continue to watch for changes in the virus’ genetic sequences and in disease surveillance systems. Some people who have had severe H1N1 infections this year had underlying medical conditions such as pregnancy and obesity, but others did not.The CDC urged health providers to recommend seasonal flu vaccination, and it encouraged them to consider antiviral treatment as early as possible for any patient with confirmed or suspected flu who has a severe, complicated, or progressive infection or is at higher risk for complications.Texas and a handful of other south-central states are the nation’s flu hot spots to date, according to the most recent surveillance report from the CDC. Clusters of severe respiratory illnesses have surfaced at some Texas hospitals. The 2009 H1N1 virus has been confirmed in some of the patients, and some deaths have been reported, especially in the area around Houston.Dec 24 CDC HAN notice Dec 20 CIDRAP News story “Texas cluster part of rising H1N1 activity in state, nation” H5N2 on Chinese poultry farm leads to culling of 125,000An outbreak of highly pathogenic H5N2 avian influenza on a poultry farm in northeastern China has resulted in the culling of 125,700 birds, according to a World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) notice posted Dec 21.The farm is located in the city of Baoding in Hebei province, about 140 kilometers southwest of Beijing. Symptoms of the disease began showing up in the farm’s chickens Dec 17, and about 4,000 chickens died.Samples from the diseased birds were confirmed as H5N2 by the National Avian Influenza Reference Laboratory. The farm has been placed under quarantine and disinfected. Dec 21 OIE report Dec 23 NBC News item on the outbreak H7N1, H7N7 avian flu strains strike South African ostrich farmsThree outbreaks of low-pathogenic H7N1 avian influenza have been reported on commercial ostrich farms in Australia, according to an OIE notice posted Dec 24. They represent the most recent events in an outbreak that began in October.The farms are located in Eastern Cape province. Sixty-four cases of subclinical infection have been confirmed among the 2,906 susceptible ostriches on the farms, for a morbidity rate of 2.20%. No birds have died of the disease or been culled. The farms have been disinfected and put under quarantine.In another development in South African avian flu, a case of H7N7 avian flu has been reported in an ostrich on a commercial farm in Western Cape province. The farm has 1,005 susceptible birds, for a morbidity rate of 0.10%, according to a Dec 23 OIE follow-up report on the outbreak, which was first reported in February.Dec 24 OIE report on Eastern Cape farms Dec 23 OIE report on Western Cape farmA related OIE follow-up report, this one pertaining to an outbreak of low-pathogenic H7 avian flu in South Africa beginning at the end of July, reported no new cases. The outbreak involved indigenous wild birds and an exotic parrot kept in captivity. The previous report noted 4 cases among 2,000 susceptible birds, for a morbidity rate of 0.20%.Dec 23 OIE report on South African birds Testosterone-regulated genes may suppress flu-vaccine response in menThe body’s response to influenza vaccine may be influenced by testosterone-regulated genes, helping to explain why men often show a less-robust response to vaccines, in particular influenza vaccines, than women, according to a study released Dec 23 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).In the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)–funded study, researchers from Stanford University used a systems analysis approach to study antibody responses to the 2008-09 trivalent seasonal flu vaccine (TIV) in 53 women and 34 men of different ages.The authors found that the women, compared with the men, had elevated antibody responses to TIV and elevated expression of inflammatory cytokines. They traced the weaker responses in men to a tendency toward high expression levels of a cluster of genes that participate in lipid biosynthesis and that have been found previously to be up-regulated by testosterone.The men with the highest levels of testosterone and most elevated expression of the gene cluster had the weakest antibody responses to the TIV. In their discussion, the authors note that from an evolutionary perspective, the immunosuppressive effects of testosterone may act as a homeostatic mechanism to, for example, protect against the potentially deadly cytokine storm that can occur in healthy males in the presence of pandemic influenza. Dec 23 PNAS study Dec 23 NIAID news release on the studylast_img read more

BVI Gov’t prepares for another possible active hurricane season

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first_imgThe Government of the BVI has initiated a plan to get ready for what may be another active season, according to the preliminary predictions released in December 2017.According to the Department of Disaster Management (DDM), the commencement of the 2018 hurricane season is just about three months away and residents of the BVI are being asked to utilise this off-season to get their homes and businesses repaired and ready.The Atlantic Hurricane Season runs from 1st June to 30th November.Director of DDM, Sharleen DaBreo while speaking about the ongoing preparations being made said that they have commenced a detailed inspection of the Emergency Shelters that were officially designated in 2017 and they are also looking at other facilities that were used during the passage of Hurricanes Irma and Maria. Read more at: BVI Platinum News Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Jan 27, 2020 Feb 10, 2020 Mar 27, 2020 You may be interested in… May 4, 2020 Building Disaster Resilience in Caribbean’s Culture Sector CDEMA, UNOCHA host data, information management training in… Elizabeth Riley appointed CDEMA Executive Director (Ag) BVI launches Flood-Resilient SMART Communities ProjectDecember 28, 2017, BRIDGETOWN, Barbados – Three flood-prone communities in the British Virgin Islands (BVI) will soon benefit from a project that will help them build resilience to that particular climate change impact. The Establishing Flood-Resilient SMART Communities through Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO) Partnerships project will target the communities of Sea…December 28, 2017In “British Virgin Islands”CDB launches US$65.5M rehabilitation, reconstruction project in the British Virgin Islands[su_pullquote align=”right”]“It is time to get our livelihoods back on track. It is time for us to get on with the several projects and initiatives that are identified for each ministry in the loan agreement. And, it is time to weather proof our infrastructure and rebuild it in a way…April 12, 2018In “British Virgin Islands”WMO Hurricane Committee reviews devastating 2017 seasonThe World Meteorological Organization’s Hurricane Committee meets from 9 to 13 April to review the devastating 2017 Atlantic hurricane season and to discuss regional coordination and operational planning to protect lives and property in the forthcoming one. The extremely active 2017 Atlantic hurricane season was one of the most destructive on record.…April 9, 2018In “Antigua & Barbuda”Share this on WhatsApp RFA Mounts Bay visits Antigua and Barbuda, Grenada last_img read more

Glanmore sells up to reduce debt

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first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

How to pick a winner: adjudication

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first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

The secret schools report: Failings are all too familiar

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first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

Confessions of a Mormon Boy

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first_imgSteven Fales, pictured, will bring Confessions of a Mormon Boy to the Alexander Bar, in Strand Street, until Saturday July 20, after its run at the Main Programme of the National Arts Festival. Written and performed by Fales, it is the true story of his journey from being a devoted, sixth-generation Mormon and father of two to coming out as gay and being excommunicated from his church. Riding an emotional roller coaster of extremes – from perfect Mormon boy in Utah to perfect rent boy in Manhattan – Fales discovers what it means to finally come home, if only in your heart. The production, which was first performed in 2001, has since been seen across the USA, Australia, Scandinavia, Europe and now South Africa. “I am thrilled to be visiting South Africa for the first time and performing this story of hope and acceptance, told with heart, song and humour,” says Fales. Confessions of a Mormon Boy will be performed at 8pm with no Sunday performance. Tickets cost R140 or R120 online. Bookings can be made at https://alexanderbar.co.za/show/Mormon_Boylast_img read more

Thousands turned down for civil legal aid since LASPO

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first_imgMore than 3,500 applications for civil legal aid in cases involving domestic violence or child abuse have been refused since reforms were introduced two years ago, official statistics have revealed.Legal aid statistics published by the Ministry of Justice show that the Legal Aid Agency received 10,455 applications between April 2013 and December 2014 for civil representation legal aid in private family law cases where there was a risk of domestic violence or child abuse.During the same period 6,916 applications were granted, though the ministry said not all applications granted in a period necessarily related to applications received within the same period. The majority of applications cite evidence relating to domestic violence.The Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012, which came into effect in April 2013, removed legal aid from the majority of private family law matters. However, applicants are granted legal aid for cases where they can prove the incidence or risk of domestic violence or child abuse through a range of prescribed forms of evidence.Earlier this year the High Court rejected a challenge, brought by the Public Law Project on behalf of lawyers’ group Rights of Women, and supported by the Law Society, to rules introduced in April 2013 in which some of the forms of evidence that victims of domestic violence are required to provide in order to apply for family law legal aid are subject to a 24-month time limit, despite the fact that perpetrators may remain a lifelong threat.Quarterly figures show that applications for exceptional case funding (ECF) fell by 31% between October and December 2014 compared with the same period in 2013.An ECF application for civil legal services is made where a case falls outside the scope of civil legal aid but the client or conducting solicitor believes there is a requirement to provide funding because failure to do so would breach the Human Rights Act.Of the 209 new ECF applications the LAA received, the average turnaround time for assessment was 15 working days against a target of 20 working days. But for the 71 applications that were resubmitted for review, the average turnaround time was one day over the 11-day target.Meanwhile, statistics show that the largest reduction in workload within criminal legal aid between October and December 2014 and the same period in 2013 was in representation in magistrates’ court, which fell by around 8,000 cases.Total expenditure on very high cost cases was £10m – a 26% reduction compared to the previous year. The MoJ said falling VHCC costs were due to changes in rates paid and a reduction in the proportion of cases classified as a VHCC due to the threshold being increased from 40 days to 60 days in April 2013.The value of cases completed between October and December 2014 was just over £410m, representing an 11% reduction on the same period in 2013, with payments split nearly evenly between criminal and civil legal aid.last_img read more

HMCTS reforms ‘focus too much on court closures’

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first_imgInadequate Wi-Fi, poor IT infrastructure, delays due to dwindling staff and insufficient evaluation of reforms – the full extent of concerns about the government’s courts reform programme have emerged in evidence from the likes of district judges, police and the Law Society in evidence submitted to MPs.The House of Commons justice select committee is looking at the effects of HM Courts & Tribunals Service’s court reform programme. Serious doubts have been cast over how successful the reforms will be based on some of the evidence received by the committee, which was published this week.The Legal Committee of HM Council of District Judges (Magistrates’ Courts) says it has seen no evidence that HMCTS has considered the lack of digital access of litigants in person, who are rising in number due to legal aid cuts for private family law cases.HMCTS appears to assume that unrepresented defendants, including those who cannot access an online process, will attend court and be able to access a duty solicitor. However, district judges are already seeing delays in the court session as defendants queue up to see the duty solicitor, ‘who in turn has to go through the laborious process of securely accessing a digital file’, a process made more difficult due to poor Wi-Fi.The district judges says HMCTS is ‘somewhat naive’ to expect video-link hearings to address the issue of court closures. A ‘significant reduction’ in administrative staff has meant that cases are not being uploaded onto ‘court store’ so a judge is unable to prepare an often busy court in advance. Documents are not being uploaded efficiently, so judges are ‘having to either chase them up to get the documents uploaded in the first place, or trawling through irrelevant documents before getting to the relevant ones’.In its evidence, Thames Valley Police states the criminal justice reforms ‘have focused overly on court closures, driven by potential digital developments, rather than taking a strategic and holistic approach to the whole criminal justice system’.It is worried about the potential ‘significant’ impact of magistrates’ court closures in Banbury and Maidenhead on accessibility and attendance levels for defendants, victims and witnesses. Parties are unable to download critical evidence in the court estate due to ‘insufficient network capacity’, which the force says is ‘significantly disrupting case progression’.The Law Society meanwhile says the scale of the reforms proposed for the criminal justice system ‘is highly ambitious and dependent on a level of technological sophistication and reliability of IT that we are not confident can be assured’. An IT breakdown earlier this year ‘raises serious concerns surrounding full reliance on technology with no contingency plan in place should a failure occur’.The Society says the Ministry of Justice and HMCTS conducted insufficient consultations with lawyers about individual strands of the reform programme as well as its overall objectives. It is ‘particularly concerned’ that it has not been shown ‘any evidence of baseline data’ against which to measure the impact of some of the reforms.last_img read more