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New consortium to make Vermont a global center of food systems education

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first_imgVermont took a giant step Thursday towards becoming a global center for food systems education. The leaders of six of Vermont’s higher education institutions were at the State House to sign a groundbreaking agreement to create a premier destination for undergraduate, graduate, and professional degree students who want to learn how to advance sustainable and robust food systems.By pledging to use Vermont as a shared food systems campus, the founding members of this new consortium will offer students a rich array of cross-institutional experiences and strengthen the state’s reputation as the national educational leader in innovative food systems implementation.Green Mountain College, Sterling College, the University of Vermont, Vermont Law School, Vermont Technical College, and the Vermont State Colleges are the founding members of the Vermont Higher Education Food Systems Consortium. The Consortium will work as a team to strengthen Vermont’s place as a world-renowned center for food systems training, education, research, and outreach.Over the next few years, Consortium members will focus on sharing courses, internships, land-based learning experiences, faculty, and annual symposia across institutions. At the same time, it will develop a coordinated marketing campaign to tell the story of the diverse and creative educational opportunities available for studying food systems in Vermont.‘Vermont’s higher education institutions have graduated generations of Vermont farmers, foresters and value added entrepreneurs,’ stated Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin. ‘Today they are taking an historic step of doing this work better together, with this collaboration offering students from across the country an unprecedented set of experiences in our working landscape. This will attract new youth to rural Vermont communities, spur innovation in the food and forest economies, and help all of us who are working to conserve Vermont’s working landscape in production for the long-term future.’Chuck Ross, Vermont’s Secretary of Agriculture, believes this consortium is poised to foster the next generation of food system leaders. ‘Vermont already leads the country in community-based agriculture and is renowned for its focus on sustainability. This consortium ensures the momentum will only build in the years to come. I applaud these institutions for joining forces to build this important program, which I am confident will have a tremendous impact on our local, national, and global food system.’The Food System encompasses the cultural, economic, ecological, sociological, nutritional, and health aspects of our food, including farming, value-added production, transportation, energy usage, marketing, distribution, and consumption.’  The Consortium members are united in their commitment to advance this work for Vermont and for communities throughout the region, the country, and the world. Through its collective educational resources, the Consortium will dramatically expand the innovative growth of the leadership, skill, and vision that the progress of the food system depends upon.The Consortium grew out of the Vermont Higher Education Food Systems Council which was founded and facilitated by the Vermont Council on Rural Development (VCRD).’ ‘ Statements from the Presidents, Dean, and Chancellor follow:”We look forward to collaborating with our higher education partners in the state to strengthen Vermont’s leadership role in building community-focused food systems that promote sustainability, local engagement and economic development.”Tom Sullivan, President, University of Vermont‘At the Vermont State Colleges, we pride ourselves on our mission of serving Vermont students with access to learning experiences which will help them achieve great things for our state. This collaboration holds excellent potential to increase awareness of Vermont institutions as places with broad access to innovative experiences in the food system, where students can get their hands dirty in pursuit of knowledge and a vibrant future.’Tim Donovan, Chancellor, Vermont State Colleges’ ‘Vermont Tech is committed to being a leader in applied agriculture and food systems education in Vermont and New England. Vermont provides a unique educational landscape for the promotion of agriculture and food systems education. The establishment of the Vermont Higher Education Food Systems Consortium provides a unique opportunity for the colleges and universities to expand collaboration and educational opportunities for students across America and around the world to come to study in our unique food systems laboratory that is Vermont.’Phil Conroy, President, Vermont Technical College’ ‘Vermont is at the forefront of important changes in how we view agriculture and our global food system. With this new emphasis on collaboration in higher education, we will ensure that the state remains a pioneer and incubator by leading the way forward to a more just and healthy food system.’Matthew Derr, President, Sterling College’ ‘Green Mountain College’s graduate and undergraduate programs in sustainable food systems have seen dramatic growth in the last few years. We see tremendous promise for this new consortium to expand opportunities for students across the state and make Vermont the national leader in food systems education.’Paul Fonteyn, President, Green Mountain College’ ‘This collaboration advances an alliance between two of Vermont’s major economic drivers’education and agriculture. Each of our schools is devoted to advancing community-based agriculture. Together we can utilize Vermont’s iconic brand to attract more students from around the nation and the world, and offer them a more complete education.’Marc Mihaly, Dean, Vermont Law SchoolSource: Vermont Council on Rural Development. For information about the Consortium, contact VCRD Executive Director Paul Costello at pcostello@vtrural.org(link sends e-mail) or (802) 223-5763. 11.7.2013‘last_img read more

Banker distorts credit union model

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first_imgby. B. Dan BergerFrank Keating’s June 23 editorial in The Hill is business as usual for the bankers, spinning distortions about credit unions in an effort to undercut the competition and shift scrutiny away from the banking industry.So let me set the record straight.Credit unions exist to serve all of their members. While credit union membership has certainly grown since the passage of the Federal Credit Union Act in 1934, the credit union business model today is the same as it was then.Credit unions aren’t in business for profit. They are run by their members, for their members – not a limited group of shareholders – and this applies whether the members are athletes or students. Earnings at a credit union go right back to members in the form of higher dividends and lower rates and fees. Credit unions also have long been recognized for their financial literacy efforts, so the credit union in question here sounds like a perfect example of a credit union formed to fulfill a core mission – helping members remain financially fit.Credit unions do pay taxes. Though credit unions are exempt from federal income taxes, they still pay many taxes, like payroll and other state and local taxes. What the bankers aren’t telling you is that nearly one-third of banks are Subchapter S corporations and don’t pay federal income tax at the corporate level either.Bankers complain that credit unions have an unfair advantage – if so, why have only two banks converted to credit unions, while over 30 credit unions have converted to banks just in the past 20 years?Moreover, a study commissioned by the Small Business Administration’s Office of Advocacy in 2011 found that bank business lending was largely unaffected by changes in credit unions’ business lending, and credit unions’ business lending can actually help offset declines in bank business lending during a recession. The study shows that during the 2007-2010 financial crisis, while banks’ small business lending decreased, credit union business lending increased as a percentage of their assets. Clearly, credit unions continued to serve Main Street as banks turned people away. continue reading » 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Depicting is necessary for much of human communication

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first_imgLinkedIn “In L.A., they would have–” He leveled a finger at some imaginary nestlings and made a gun-cocking sound.As Clark notes, WG could easily have described the scene with the phrase “shot those falcons.” What he did instead was depict the scene with his finger, hand, head, eyes, and voice. The result included a depiction (leveling a finger and making a gun-cocking sound) in place of the phrase “shot those falcons.” Traditional accounts are unable to handle composites like this.What is depicting? In the theory developed in this paper, to depict something is to stage a scene. When WG leveled his finger at the imaginary falcons, he enacted a shooter in L.A. aiming a rifle at some falcons. And he did that so that his listener could imagine the scene vividly. Depicting is much the same as putting on a play in the theater or engaging in make-believe play.Depicting, according to Clark, is largely complementary to describing. To begin with, many ideas that are impossible to put into words are easy to depict. Tennis coaches don’t describe how to hold a racket or do a backhand return. They demonstrate it, and in living detail. Music teachers often correct their students by playing or singing what the students should have played or sung. And although it takes years for children to tell coherent stories, they have little trouble depicting stories in make-believe play. They readily enact Cookie Monster, Mother, cops and robbers–and play out what they do.Depicting is also effective for emotion, excitement, and empathy. In telling stories and passing on gossip, people not only describe, but dramatize what the protagonists said and did, often with passion and attitude. And in apologizing, people not only say “Sorry” but add facial gestures that depict their regret.The idea, then, is that depicting is a method of communication. Without depictions, talk would be flat, lifeless, and sometimes even impossible. Email Share When we think of language, we usually think of words, phrases, and sentences–strings of abstract symbols. In research over the past 50 years, cognitive and social scientists have developed extensive accounts of how people communicate with these symbols. But when people are face to face, they also communicate with actions that depict people, objects, and events. They create these depictions with their hands, arms, head, face, voice, and entire body, sometimes with other props but often without.In an article recently published Online First in Psychological Review, Herbert Clark argues that spontaneous depictions like these are missing from general accounts of how people communicate, and that is a major failing. Why? Because depicting is common in everyday conversation and depicting things is fundamentally different from describing things. Also, a great many utterances are “composites” of depicting and describing.Clark’s point is nicely illustrated in a report, from the New Yorker, of Hollywood director WG telling correspondent TF about having to stop filming in New York because of some falcons nesting on the ledge of a building:center_img Share on Facebook Pinterest Share on Twitterlast_img read more

Runner Up: The Zipper On The Monster

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first_imgSean Rhatigan, Grade 3, Westhampton Beach Elementary SchoolChildren’s minds can conjure up some wicked things. So naive, they are, to think that the scariest thing in the world is a monster under their bed or in their closet, waiting to strike when they fall asleep or have to get up to use the bathroom in the middle of the night. They get scared by movie monsters, laughable beasts made with the imperfect hands of humans, comprised of paltry arts and crafts that are hardly scary at all to anybody with sense. In these movies, it is commonplace to see mistakes like the zipper on the suit of the monster, reminding us that nothing in those films could possibly be real.Yet children with vivid imaginations who know no better still cower in fear at the thought of the supernatural. Perhaps these monsters take the shape of a tall man with no eyes, or a vicious beast with fangs and claws, or an evil old lady with wrinkled skin and gangly fingers that beckon them to her embrace. Perhaps they are indescribable, far beyond the comprehension of any human thought. But, like the monsters in the movies, they are nothing more than figments of the twisted maw of human creation, memories of a fear that we all hold deep within.Except these monsters are real.We lurk in every shadow in every darkness. In every dark room and long hallway, in every closet and under every bed. We hide in the walls, behind the shower curtains, and in places that nobody dares to venture. We are everywhere, but we don’t like to be seen. It is so convenient for us that you pretend that we don’t exist, that you shove us out of your mind as you go about your day. For when eyes fall upon us, the world changes. We are the whispers in the wind, carrying the weight of a thousand burdens, travelling like silent serpents, entering the ears of those who are foolish enough to listen.There are no zippers on our backs. When you were a teenager, and still had the mind of a child that was more concerned with sheepish things than what really mattered, we were there.We watched you grow, blossoming from a young, fruitful child into another hapless adult. We were there when you went to college and pretended like you knew everything, without a care in the world for anybody who disagreed with you. We were there when you met the person you thought you would love forever, and we laughed at you for even thinking such a thing. We were there when you finally got that job you always wanted, and when you realized that you hated everything about it, we laughed, too.We watched from the storm drains as you struggled. We were there when you had your first fight. We were there when you broke your vows and cried about it like a wounded animal, the hypocrite that you are. We were there when you felt that pain for the first time, the pain of loss, the pain of knowing that no matter what you did, there was nothing that could fix it. We witnessed every moment of your happiness; every single “I love you,” and every hug and every kiss, every feel-good time that you had, every happy memory, and even every bad one, too. We were there for all of that, until you stood on the beach that one summer evening, staring out into the yawning infinity of the auburn sky, with nobody by your side, and whispered, “Can you believe it?”Can you?We will always be watching you. We will be there when you try to move on and forget about everything. We will be there when you start over. We will be there when you are driving down the street at night, lurking in the back seat of your car. We will be there when you are all alone, with nothing but the wind to comfort you. We will be there beside you when you turn out the lights and close your eyes to sleep at night. Then, when you die, and your final breath leaves your body like a soft puff of mist, we will be there, too. And we will be the only thing that comes with you.By Miller Crowley CrokeGrade 12, Southampton High School Sharelast_img read more

Court of Appeal judge admits motoring offence

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first_imgA Court of Appeal Judge has lost his licence for 56 days after speeding through a red light – his fourth motoring offence in eighteen months. Sir Mathew Thorpe (pictured), 73, could have been disqualified for six months, but convinced District Judge Daphne Wickham that this would cause ‘exceptional hardship’ to his farming work. Thorpe admitted failing to comply with a red light in Victoria Embankment on 3 February. He was also fined £250, with £250 costs. City of Westminster Magistrates’ Court heard that Sir Mathew had clocked up nine penalty points for speeding in November 2009, July 2010 and April this year. An additional three penalty points were added for the red light offence, making him liable for disqualification. His Skoda Fabia was snapped by a traffic camera jumping the red light at 39 mph at 6.55am. ‘I do rely on the car to get between my two places of work, but more importantly for my farming in Wiltshire,’ Sir Mathew told the court. ‘The farm buildings are the hub of the wheel. Cattle have to be fed by driving around the hub. I work three days a week on the farm.’ Thorpe told the court he is separated from his wife and has one part-time employee to help him, insisting it was not practical to find more staff. ‘It would be difficult, I can’t say impossible, but in a small community I can’t think of anyone qualified or suitable. ‘I would want somebody who knew what they were doing on a farm.’ Thorpe said he needed to drive animal feed a distance of one-and-a-half miles to take care of his cattle. His lawyer Yvette Kresner said: ‘It is a very difficult junction. There is a large bike lane and two other lanes. ‘It was a split-second decision by Sir Mathew not to cause danger to other road users, and go through the lights.’ District Judge Wickham – who knows Sir Mathew professionally – said: ‘He is entitled to put these circumstances in front of me and six months would be a long time for the defendant to be disqualified if he was able to maintain that aspect of his life.’ A spokesman for the Judicial Office said that accrording to normal procedures, the matter would be referred to the Office for Judicial Complaints for inquiries to be made, and for ‘consideration in due course by the Lord Chief Justice and the Lord Chancellor’.last_img read more

The year of the lawyer: Predictions

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first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

New government, new regs?

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first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

Maximus inks Etihad Airways deal

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first_imgAccording to a company statement, the service which commenced on July 1st, utilising two of Maximus’ UAE-registered A300-600RFs, will be expanded to Libya, Italy and China from September. Later this summer, Maximus, the largest freighter-only airline in the Middle East, will acquire a factory built A300-600RF to fulfil the Etihad contract, increasing the size of its fleet which includes AN124-100s, IL-76-TDs, Hercules as well as A300-600RFs.last_img

InnoTrans 2020 provides gateway to Berlin-Brandenburg

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first_imgINNOTRANS: Companies from Berlin and the Land of Brandenburg will be exhibiting together on a joint stand in Hall B of the CityCube building, with a combined display area of more than 1 200 m².‘At InnoTrans 2020 some 80 exhibitors from the capital Berlin and the Land of Brandenburg will be represented on the combined stand’, explains Dajana Pefestorff, Senior Manager International Business, at economic development agency Wirtschaftsförderung Land Brandenburg GmbH.‘The keen interest in the fair shows how important Berlin-Brandenburg is as a business location for transport technology. The stand will act as a showroom for the economic performance and innovative drive of companies from this region.‘Rail suppliers will be showcasing their expertise in rolling stock technology, infrastructure and operations, and seeking to establish partnerships both at home and abroad’.last_img read more

Tropical storm watch issued for Dominica

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first_img Share Share Sharing is caring! 10 Views   no discussions Tweetcenter_img Share LocalNews Tropical storm watch issued for Dominica by: – August 2, 2012 The Dominica Meteorological Service has issued a tropical storm watch for Dominica at 8:00 am on Thursday, 2nd August, 2012.A disorganized depression 5 is headed for the Windward Islands; therefore a tropical storm watch is in effect for Dominica.A tropical storm watch means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area generally within forty-eight (48) hours.Location…13.0n 54.3wAbout 450 mi…725 km east of the Windward IslandsMaximum sustained winds…35 mph…55 km/hPresent movement…west at 20 mph…32 km/hMinimum central pressure…1008 mb…29.77 inchesDiscussion and 48-hour outlookAt 1100 am ast…1500 utc…the center of tropical depression five was located near latitude 13.0 north…longitude 54.3 west. The depression is moving toward the west near 20 mph. This general motion is expected to continue for the 48 hours. On the forecast track, the center of the depression should be near the Windward Islands on Friday.Maximum sustained winds are near 35 mph…55 km/h…with higher gusts. Little change in strength is likely for the next day or so, but some strengthening is expected thereafter.Residents are advised to continue to monitor the progress/development of this system and begin to take all precautionary measures in preparation for the arrival of this system.Dominica Meteorological Servicelast_img read more