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Iker Casillas’ comments which might upset David De Gea

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first_img “Si me llamara la selección y el Real Madrid, volvería encantado”, #UniversoValdano con @IkerCasillas el miércoles 21, a las 22.30h en @vamos pic.twitter.com/9RYA1XszsA— #Vamos de Movistar+ (@vamos) 16 de novembre de 2018 Las palabras de Casillas que no gustarán a De Gea IN SPORT.ES 16/11/2018 Porto’s current goalkeeper, Iker Casillas, has insisted once again that he’d love a return to international football under Luis Enrique. Casillas, who has spoken with the newly appointed coach, isn’t hiding the fact he wants to represent Spain again. Upd. at 20:17 center_img CET Sport EN Casillas was a guest on the popular football programme ‘Universo Valdano’ which will be broadcast next Wednesday. “If the national team asked for you to return, would you?” “Happily.” “If Real Madrid asked you to come back, would you?” “Of course. I can’t ever forget where I grew up.” These comments are coming out just as David De Gea’s performances for the national team are being questioned. The Manchester United stopper didn’t have the best of game in the crucial 3-2 loss to Croatia on Thursday night either. And, by coincidence, Casillas also posted the following message on social media when Croatia scored the first goal. “Return to training! It’s a relaxing week with the international break. Wishing all the best for my loyal followers!”last_img read more

Coastal change for Collins

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first_imgNow in his late 30s, the former Kooweerup player-coach and multiple premiership-winner at Beaconsfield made the move to Noosa with his wife Aleisha and their young family last year – and they’re not looking back.Collins – who’s also a former premiership-winning skipper at Cora Lynn, a premiership player-coach at Belgrave, and has played at Moe in the Gippsland League and Mulgrave in the Eastern Football League – is looking to try and win one last premiership before hanging up the boots for good.It’s a chance he wasn’t sure he’d ever get, after retiring in 2017 – the same season in which he’d battled testicular cancer.But the move to the sunshine state has been a godsend for Ben and Aleisha, as well as kids Archie and Brighton.Now running the Queensland arm of his AusConnect Underground Services business, while younger brother Dave – a champion player in his own right, and starting ruck rover in the Casey VFL team of the decade from 2006 to 2015 – looks after the Melbourne operations, Collins couldn’t be happier with his family’s coastal change.He played his first game for Noosa in Division 1 of the QAFL on Saturday, booting two majors – including the first of the game – as his side prevailed over Mayne in front of a bumper home crowd for the battle of the Tigers, 9.18 (72) to 8.7 (55).Collins spoke to the Gazette on Sunday, after a morning beach recovery session and returning from a day out fishing on the boat with Archie.It’s a far cry from the dreary wintery Melbourne conditions.“The standard of footy is probably in between West Gippsland and the old Casey Cardinia (which has effectively become AFL Outer East Premier), so it’s a pretty good competition,” he said of the QAFL’s Division 1.Collins spent some time on the ball for Noosa on Saturday, along with a former star of the Ballarat region, Shane Hutchinson. Both are well and truly in the twilight of their careers, and both are relishing the chance to provide some on-field leadership to coach Adam Bovalino’s side.“It’s a different sort of footy,” Collins explained.“Saturday was a bit of a grind, but because it’s so dry it’s fairly quick out there.“It’s different to home, but I loved it. It was 23 or 24 degrees with not a breath of wind, and we had a massive crowd come along.”Collins has been fortunate enough to be part of some proud, beloved local clubs in Melbourne’s south east and he says Noosa is right up there with them when it comes to the Tigers’ culture – a feat particularly impressive considering there are so many players from other states who’ve moved up there for a sea change.“I guess footy in Noosa has always been really well-followed because they’re very much like a Victorian club – there are a lot of Victorians who’ve moved up here,” Collins said.“I’ve followed Noosa for a while already – we nearly made the move up here seven or eight years ago.“No doubt people in Victoria would underestimate the standard of footy up here – I’m sure of it.”After years of contemplating it, the Collins family finally bit the bullet and made the move up north last year.“I spoke to Bova (Bovalino) once our season finished at Kooweerup last year and said we were making the move, and that I wanted to get involved in the footy club in some way to meet people because we didn’t really know anyone,” Collins explained.“I caught up with him the first week we moved up here, and we went out for lunch with our families, and we’ve all become really close since. It’s made the transition so easy.”There’s a degree of irony that there’s so little footy being played in a footy-mad state such as Victoria right now (due to the impacts of Covid-19), but it’s in full swing in Queensland – and that’s not lost on Collins, who’s constantly thinking of everyone back home.“I still speak to (former Kooweerup team mates) Vossy [Nathan Voss], Tex [Luke Walker], Mitchy [youngest brother Mitch Collins] and all those guys and it’s just weird that I’m coming out of retirement after two-and-a-half years and I’m playing, and those poor buggers can’t play footy back home,” he said.“I wouldn’t change our move for the world.“It’s been the best decision ever for us. It’s an unbelievable place to bring up the kids.“I played a game of footy on Saturday and headed out on the boat and to the beach the day after. If I’d have been in Melbourne I would’ve been on the couch all day. “We do all sorts of family things together up here, and we love it.“It’s just a beautiful place of the world, and to actually be able to call this place home now, that’s just awesome.”Collins hasn’t decided if he’ll play on next year – given so much of that decision rests on how his body holds up in 2020 – but he’s relishing the chance of taking a step back from coaching, and just playing for the love of the game.“I’m just taking it week by week and enjoying my footy,” he explained.“It’s been more than a decade since I haven’t been an assistant coach or a coach, so I’m just enjoying the playing side of things again.“I’ve got no aspirations to be a head coach, but I’d like to help out – whether that’s being an assistant, or helping out on the committee. I’ll stay involved around the club because they’re such a great bunch of people.”Noosa continues its QAFL Division 1 premiership quest when the side heads to Aspley to take on the Hornets this Saturday. By sports editor Russell Bennett While Queensland has just become the centre of the AFL world, until at least the end of the home and away season, Ben Collins already made it his footy epicentre for his family’s exciting new chapter.last_img read more

Bravery under pressure

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first_imgBy Helena Adeloju A Pakenham primary school girl who called triple zero and helped her mother until paramedics arrived has…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

LVR grad Sean Denison experiences career year playing pro hoops in Romania

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first_imgWhen Sean Denison hopped a flight last summer for Romania, he hoped the move to the European Basketball team would be a good one.Well the move proved to be good for CSM Oradea, Denison’s new club, and amazing for the former L.V. Rogers hoop star.Not only did CSM Oradea make history but also Denison realized a happiness about playing the sport again that had been missing for a few years.”It was a successful year for me personally . . . and it was felt really good to play in a competitive league again,” the 28-year-old power forward said after completing the successful campaign in Romania.“We made history all year,” the 6’11” 245-pound Denison added.“First we got a nod from the EuroChallenge league saying we were the best new entry (first year team) in EuroChallenge this season.“For the first time the club made the Romanian Cup final and then for the first time in club history we made the finals in the playoffs.”Unfortunately, CSM Oradea came up short in both finals — losing in the Romanian Cup and League Final — the latter, a six-point setback in the final of the best-of-five series. “That last loss was tough because I felt like we were the better team when we were playing our game and our style,” explained Denison, part of two BC Basketball Championships during his time at Trafalgar Junior and L.V. Rogers High Schools.“But they played very good in the last game and we fought hard so none of us on the team have any regrets.”Denison was a star during his high school days, leading the Bombers to a fourth-place finish at the BC High School AAA Basketball Championships during his senior season after titles in Grade 9 at Trafalgar and Grade 10 Junior crown at LVR.The local hoop star went on to play four seasons at Santa Clara in NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball. He played also for Canada internationally program for some years — the Canadian Senior National Team in 2007, the U21 National Team in 2004 and at the Pan-American Games trials.Denison, who came to Romania following stops in Turkey, Germany and Russia, played 37 Liga Nationala games for CSM Oradea recording 10.9 ppg, 5.3 rpg, 1.2 apg, 1.1 spg and 1.2bpg  — the latter was fifth best in the league.In six games in EuroChallenge Denison averaged impressive 15.5 ppg, 9.0 rpg, 1.5 apg, 1.2 spg and 1.7 bpg and was also voted to Eurobasket.com All-Romanian League Honorable Mention Team.“I played very well in EuroChallenge but had a hard time adjusting my game for the referees in the Romanian league,” he admitted.“Almost every away game I would have two fouls in five minutes and have to sit until the third quarter. They just call the game different and there is no governing body to regulate or review their calls. So instead of a block or a steal I would get a foul. “These things add up and as a result I couldn’t play as aggressively as I wanted in the normal league.”Denison, on a one-year contract in Romania, is considering his options for next season. He’s returned to Canada to spend his offseason with his wife, Tricia, and two children in the North Okanagan near Salmon Arm.“Not sure where I will play next year, still looking at the possibilities but I feel great,” he said. “I feel better every year and will continue to work on my game and staying healthy.”No doubt after the 2013-14 campaign, a few teams most likely will be calling for his services.last_img read more

KRIEGER COMMITS TO MEN’S HOCKEY PROGRAM

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first_imgStory Links The University of Toronto men’s hockey program is pleased to announce that Ross Krieger, a former assistant captain with the North York Rangers, has accepted his offer of admission and committed to playing for the Varsity Blues this fall.”Ross is someone we first noticed while scouting his then-teammate Kyle Clarke two seasons ago”, said Varsity Blues bench boss Ryan Medel. “Ross will fit in nicely with our forward group. He has a strong hockey IQ, is extremely quick and has a good release. He has also been someone that has elevated his game every post-season in Junior.”Krieger spent the last two and half seasons with the North York-based team, playing in the Ontario Junior Hockey League (OJHL). An instrumental part of the team’s power play and penalty kill units, Krieger led the OJHL in regular season, game-winning goals with nine. As one of the team’s leaders in 2018-19, the Pain Court, Ont. product notched 18 goals and 23 assists (41 points) during the regular season and added six goals and two assists in 11 playoff games. For his outstanding efforts, Krieger was recognised and awarded the team’s Brant Snow Memorial leadership award for his contributions on and off the ice. “I’m very excited to start my career at the University Of Toronto”, said Krieger.  “I can’t wait to get things going. Go Blues!”Krieger has enrolled at Woodsworth College and will be studying social sciences.For more information, scores and highlights on your favourite U of T athletes and teams, please visit www.varsityblues.ca. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook for the latest and greatest in Varsity Blues intercollegiate athletics.Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

Pilot rises above the turbulence

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first_imgSTEVENSON RANCH – Rudy Perez sat there, his head heavy in his hands, certain he’d never live his dream. He wondered if his Army Air Forces captain knew he was just six weeks away from graduating when he gave him that pink slip – two of those and his plan would die. Perez had the courage to ask the man in the shiny boots why. “I ain’t ever graduated one of you,” the captain said. “I am not about to start now.” Perez had thought up various scenarios where he’d fail to become a pilot, but the fact his grandparents were Mexican was never among them. “I thought right there my career was over,” Perez said. Sixty-five years later, Perez, now 83, has a crystal clear memory of how those boots clicked away that day. As it turned out, a trusting colonel was willing to give Perez a shot – one that led to a successful 32-year career as a U.S. military pilot. It had Perez living in a dozen different countries around the world and flying over four different continents. He flew several fighter planes in three U.S wars – World War II, Korea and Vietnam – and retired in 1973 as a colonel. Perez also was personal pilot for two Air Force generals. Now an octagenarian, Perez looks great for his age. There are a few hard-earned wrinkles, but his lanky 6-foot, 2-inch frame reveals his good health. He remains humble and at times even skeptical. “Who knew a little boy from San Antonio could have all this,” Perez said with a smile. The oldest of five boys growing up in the 1930s, Perez was raised in loving family. Perez’s dad was an Army veteran who talked to his boys about following in his footsteps. Perez never aspired to be more than what his dad wanted him to be. Perez was just 6 when his father took him to Randolph Airfield in Texas. “When I saw all those pilots with their four-year degrees and their convertibles, given to them by Ford Motor Company and the pretty ladies in them, I knew that was what I wanted to do,” Perez said. He followed the dream, but years later he found the Aviation Cadet Pilot training program – where Army Air Forces pilots trained – a lonely place. He was one of a few Latino men to complete pilot training. As Perez explains it, during the tail end of the World War II the academy was opened up to noncollege graduates. This left the gates open to many young minority men who otherwise wouldn’t have had the opportunity to fly. “It was a different time then,” Perez said. “There was discrimination, blatant and not so blatant. “I learned to accept that I didn’t look like everyone else, that I would have to work a lot harder to be accepted and that I would never complain.” Perez eventually chose to fly fighter aircraft and multiengine planes. It was his job to escort bomber planes – that usually housed nine servicemen – to their targets and then return them safely to their take-off spots. The freckled Perez minimizes his military role. In World War II and the Korean War he never shot anyone down. And in his two tours in Vietnam, he was frustrated because his rank left him with an unfortunate job. “I had to send men off to die,” Perez said. When Perez’s wife, Constance, was having surgery last year a man saw Perez, sporting his chocolate leather pilot jacket, and it drove the man to tears. “He came up to me and asked me if I was a `little friend,”‘ Perez said, explaining the common term used to describe fighter pilots. “He hugged me and started crying.” But Perez is quick to turn away this type of attention. “I’m no hero,” Perez said. “I just did what a hundred thousand other men did.” It was this behind-the-scenes approach that a large number of minority servicemen adopted over the years. Recently, the lack of recognition for Latino men in World War II was brought to light when Ken Burns, a Public Broadcasting Service legend, produced his quintessential piece on the war and failed to include Latinos and several other ethnicities. Alex Reza, retired high school teacher and community advocate, said minorities in the military have been overlooked for their heroism for years. That is why when Reza met Perez 12 years ago, he knew right away his students in the predominantly poor and Latino neighborhood of San Fernando had to hear the man’s story. Reza gave Perez his first taste at working with Latino youths. “Students were always impressed by him as a person,” Reza said. “A lot of students don’t realize the world that people like Rudy grew up in. There was a tremendous driving force that was motivating him and a commitment to overcome what he was facing.” Now Perez does his best to stay connected to the youths of color he meets. They need to know, he said, that anything is possible. “When you have a dad that comes home drunk and beats your mom it’s hard to believe that you can be something,” Perez said. A military man is usually a man of few words, Perez admits. But now in his later years Perez says he enjoys reading articles and “getting mad.” Memorial Day always brings up mixed emotions for Perez. He still enjoys doing flyover’s with members of his Army Air Forces class – about 12 out of the original 200 can still join him. “It’s sad, every day we lose 1,000 to 1,200 men from that era,” Perez said. “Pretty soon that part of history will be gone.” For a man who’s seen the destruction of war from above, it’s sad to see fellow citizens overlook the meaning of the holiday. “The day has become about sales,” Perez said. “Drive around this neighborhood Monday and see how many flags you see waving.” Perez, still married to Constance after 64 years, left the military after Vietnam and became a top executive for aerospace giant Lockheed Corp. He now serves as a motivational speaker to youths, teaches aspiring pilots and still flies himself, often with his “wingman,” Mike Jauregui, a youngster of 72. Perez’s skills in the air are worthy of respect, Jauregui said. “I always let him take the lead, he is one of the few men I trust flying with,” he said. “I really respect his abilities.” The men fly for lunch dates in Camarillo or Santa Clara, but their passion is to fly in formation with their squadron, the Condor Squadron at Van Nuys Airport. No question, Perez won’t give up flying easily. “Flying is better than chasing all the girls or drinking at all the bars in the world,” he said. “I guess everything comes to an end sometime, but as long as I can pass a flight physical I’ll keep on flying.” connie.llanos@dailynews.com (661) 257-5254160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img

Thibaut Courtois refuses to blame Jose Mourinho for in-form hitman’s Chelsea exit

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first_img Romelu Lukaku Chelsea goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois has refused to blame manager Jose Mourinho for getting rid of Romelu Lukaku.The Belgian forward was signed by the Blues as the long-term replacement for legendary lone striker Didier Drogba.But he got tired of being a bit-part player under the Portuguese and forced through a loan and then a transfer to Everton.This week he struck his 50th goal for the Merseyside club, while Chelsea striker Diego Costa is struggling to find the net.But Courtois, ahead of his side’s Champions League match with Porto, refused to blame the Special One for letting Lukaku move on before he could prove his potential.When asked if Chelsea and Mourinho made a mistake, Courtois said: “I am really happy for Romelu but we are playing Porto tomorrow [Wednesday] not Everton.” 1last_img read more

Mourinho ‘sorry’ for Allardyce and says he still respects axed England boss

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first_img1 Jose Mourinho and Sam Allardyce Jose Mourinho has expressed his sympathy for Sam Allardyce over his England humiliation.Allardyce’s dream job as Three Lions boss turned into a nightmare as he was forced to leave his post on Tuesday after only 67 days in charge.The 61-year-old’s position was deemed untenable by the FA after he was filmed by undercover reporters making a range of damaging remarks and offering advice on circumventing rules on third-party ownership.Allardyce looked close to tears as he spoke to reporters on Wednesday morning and confessed he had made an ‘error of judgement’.And Mourinho, who had praised the former Sunderland manager’s appointment as England boss this summer, admits he is disappointed to see his reign end in the manner it has.Talking ahead of Manchester United’s Europa League clash with Zorya Luhansk, Mourinho said: “The only thing I can say is that I like Sam, I feel sorry for that because I know that it was the dream job.“The second thing is what happened obviously is not going to interfere in any way with my relationship with him. I liked him and I respected him before and that is not going to change.“The third thing is this is between him and the Football Association and I have nothing to say about it.”last_img read more

Sportsday Podcast on talkSPORT 2: December 19, 2017

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first_imgThis Tuesday morning on Sportsday we bring you your essential round-up of the morning’s top sports stories.last_img