Month: July 2019

A disabled campaigner has told MPs that he believe

Posted on

first_imgA disabled campaigner has told MPs that he believes cuts to support have contributed to a quarter of his neighbours in the sheltered housing development where he lives dying in just one year.Larry Gardiner told the communities and local government select committee this week, as part of its inquiry into adult social care, that five of his neighbours had died in the last year.He said that to lose so many neighbours in such a short period of time was “absolutely unprecedented”.He said: “Some of those deaths were expected and anticipated… but there were others which I think were premature, unexpected and for which there should be an investigation, and there hasn’t been.”Gardiner, who campaigns for the rights of other people with dementia and volunteers as an independent advocate, said that his local authority, Oxfordshire County Council, will “only fund something for which there’s a statutory duty”.He said that services he was previously receiving no longer exist, and the sheltered housing units where he lives no longer have a council-funded visiting service, which previously provided support for older people such as his neighbours.The sheltered housing flats also no longer have a live-in warden, while the communal lounge and kitchen can no longer be used because there are no staff available, and although there is a bathroom with a hoist, there is no-one trained or insured to use it, he told the committee.Gardiner (pictured giving evidence to the committee) said: “We live in a building with lots of amenity but no service, with no actual tangible support for residents.“The result of that has been in the last year I have lost five of my neighbours.“Old people die, and sick people die, and in sheltered housing it is expected that people will die, but there are 20 units where I live and in the space of a year I have lost Cath, and Michael, and John, and Chris, and Dorothy.”Disability News Service has so far been unable to contact Gardiner to discuss his evidence further.Although Oxfordshire County Council failed to answer detailed questions about Gardiner’s comments by noon today (Thursday) – including whether it was concerned about the number of deaths, and whether it had investigated his concerns – it has produced a statement, in which it admitted that it stopped providing the visiting support service last March.A council spokesman said: “The council does not fund support in sheltered housing schemes.“These support services are generally provided by landlords and are funded through a service charge to individual tenants.“Overall, the Oxfordshire market moved away from [a] residential warden model of care to [a] peripatetic warden model of social care a decade ago.“The council funded a visiting support service for older people with support needs for six years – but not since March 2016 when that service ceased. The council was never legally obliged to provide such a service.”He added: “We are happy to give advice on daytime support grants to Mr Gardiner and anybody else in Oxfordshire who feels they would need such advice.“As would be the case in any scenario where there is potential unmet eligible social care needs, we are happy to speak to local people to make clear ways to request social care assessments.“The council is fully committed to meeting eligible social care needs and has invested in better information and advice on how to request social care assessments and in direct support for people who need it most.“Oxfordshire has a diverse mixed market of housing and we do fund extra care housing services.”Gardiner, who himself receives 28 hours of council-funded support a week through direct payments, also told the committee that his care package had been written “to keep me hydrated, fed and watered and hygienic and doesn’t go beyond that”, with no provision for help with shopping or keeping his flat clean.Anna Sevenwright, another service-user who gave evidence to the committee, who receives 23 hours a week of council-funded support, said her council had already made £100 million in cuts to its spending, and is having to make another £55 million.She said she knew people “who have had their care either stopped completely or drastically reduced and I do consider myself quite fortunate”.She said: “My main worry [is that] if my condition gets worse, and I don’t know what’s going to happen in the future, that the care won’t increase to even be dignified, really.”She said her package keeps her “clean and fed, and my flat clean and tidy, and the practical needs are met”, but that it “does not promote my wellbeing”.She added: “I get six hours a week for socialisation, whatever that means.“That has to include my food shopping, my hospital appointments, which average one a week, going to church, and if I want to go swimming, because none of those things… get covered otherwise.“There are times when I have to make a choice, so I will say I won’t have a shower or I won’t cook a meal… I will use the time [with my personal assistant] to do the socialisation.“Otherwise you become extremely isolated and that’s quite distressing. I’m a 31-year-old and my friends who were at university with me are out doing all these things and my life looks extremely different to theirs and it’s a lot emptier in a way.”She also said that she had been told by her council that there was no service-user involvement in how it planned services.She told the committee: “If services were co-produced with the people using them, you would get better value for money.“They would actually be providing the service people want.“People know what they need to stay well and to stay part of society and that I think would help.”A third service-user who gave evidence, Isaac Samuels, who receives 17 hours of council-funded support a week, said he was constantly aware that his package could be cut.He said: “I’m really mindful that most of my peers have either had a dramatic funding cut or have lost their services, so I’m really conscious… that that is a potential.”He said he already has to use family and friends to fill the gap between the support he is provided with and the support he needs.He said that although local authorities talk about the need to ensure “wellbeing” for disabled people, the funding is not available to provide the necessary support.Samuels said: “We have care plans that talk about wellbeing and prevention and social aspects but in reality people aren’t able to do that because they aren’t even able to access their basic needs.“For me, there’s a real disparity between what the local authority says they are doing and what people actually experience.”He added: “I’ve never felt so isolated as I do. I live in my own home; my own home is becoming more like an institution.”He said he was grateful for the practical support provided by the council but “sometimes I feel as if I’m just a function of dress, wash, eat”.Samuels also told the committee that user-led organisations had been a “real asset” to him and his support network.Meanwhile, Surrey County Council has announced that it is considering holding a referendum on 4 May on plans to increase council tax for 2017-18 by 15 per cent in order to fund more spending on social care.The Tory-run council said that central government had cut its annual grant by £170 million since 2010, while “demand for adult social care, learning disabilities and children’s services is increasing every year”.A Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) spokeswoman said: “The government has protected local residents from high council tax rises by allowing local people to veto them through a council tax referendum.“If the council sets this proposed budget, then the taxpayers of Surrey will have the final say in a referendum in May. We should trust the people.”DCLG also announced that the government was no longer considering devolving spending on attendance allowance – a non-means-tested benefit which supports older people with care needs – from the Department for Work and Pensions to local authorities in England and Wales as part of its reform of business rates.And Rochdale council this week withdrew plans that would have seen some people with learning difficulties forced out of supported living and into residential care as a cost-saving measure, following legal action by one of its service-users.The council said (see agenda item four) that it would now launch a fresh consultation on its future plans, but that the proposed measures would not be part of its budget for 2017-18.last_img read more

Hoffmanns A Clean WellLighted Place With Good Food

Posted on

first_img 0% Our first meal here, we found the quality of the cooking to be a bit uneven. A friend and I split everything, and started out with the Puget Sound Mussels in a white wine & red pepper broth. The mussels were drizzled with a lemon aioli but were otherwise quite oddly bland themselves. Spoonfulls of the broth also revealed a lemony taste, but no evidence of red pepper, and even though you could see thinly sliced garlic, the broth was not at all garlicky.Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzThe broth was actually nice, and the mussels tastier if dipped in the broth, but the dish would have been better if we’d had a couple of slices of toasted bread to dip into it, or maybe frites.At that point, we hadn’t yet noticed the sign on the menu that bread was available on request, but request we soon did. We were so happy to learn we’d gotten some of the only two loaves Chef Hoffmann makes a day. This was quite a wonderful levain, served with butter on our first visit, and with extra virgin olive oil on the second.Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzNext up was a duck salad, with a good amount of very flavorful, tender and juicy duck, roasted beets, grapefruit sections, radishes, and arugula, in a tart dressing I couldn’t quite identify but loved .Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzDuck is good food. This salad could easily be a meal by itself (this is only the portion I put on my plate.)The wine list carries mostly small, California producers, but also some very good Argentinian and Chilean reds.We also split a panisse – a chick-pea flour cake thingy. I have to say, I’ve had a version of this dish at Frances (another restaurant in the Mission), and I’ll order it even when it doesn’t appear on their menu, it’s that good, but Hoffmann’s was a bit of a disappointment. It looked more like tofu logs and, at least on the exterior, parts were burnt almost black. Strangely, though, they did not taste burnt, except every few bites or so you’d get a bit of a charred flavor.  Our server that night even admitted that sometimes they come out very dark.   They were mostly a textural thing, without much flavor, except for the romesco sauce they sat on, which tasted mostly like Tabasco. This was my least favorite dish of the two visits I had, and while I’m describing it as if it were horrible, it wasn’t; it was just unattractive and not a wow.Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzWe also ordered the spätzle – a kind of soft noodle in the shape of tiny birds (or at least, that’s where it gets its name) – which is one of my favorite dishes to order anywhere. Sadly, this evening they were dry.Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzI know, they don’t look dry – they’re glistening! They had really good flavor, paired with butternut squash, gruyere, and crispy sage, but there was not enough cheesiness to them, and they were simply dry.For our entrée…Photo by Maria C. Ascarrunz…we split the beef brisket.  Yes, we got a LOT of food. I loved this – cooked on the rotisserie, it was tender, a bit smoky, fatty enough for me, with a warm potato salad underneath, shallots and delicious broccolini, and a tangy horseradish cream over the top. Not pretty, but a great, homey dish, where all the components really worked together. I would come back and split this with the BF next time, with a lighter salad, and be very happy.Being with a friend who wanted it, we also had dessert – an apple crisp with house-made cinnamon ice cream. Salty/sweet, really good. I love that there are so many house-made items here. I was maybe a tad too full to appreciate it as much as I could have, but it was delicious.Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzOn my second visit, our server steered the BF and I to a few things, which was greatly appreciated. This time, we loved everything from start to finish.To begin with, he suggested a really good, inky Malbec from Argentina, of which I had two.He also suggested the grilled romaine lettuce salad, with avocado, tiny toms, radishes, and buttermilk dressing. Oh my! What a fantastic salad! Such a nice, smoky char on the still-warm lettuce, with the creamy/tarty dressing. I don’t think I could come back here and not order this.Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzWe also ordered the roasted multi-colored cauliflower, which almost tasted – deliciously so – like it had a little anchovy mixed into it, but our server said no, that was just the capers. The dish was lemony, with a good amount of Parmigiano. Fantastic. This was maybe my favorite dish of the evening, in an evening in which everything was great.Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzThe BF’s deluxe burger, served on a house-made pretzel bun and topped with bacon and gruyere, was maybe a tad underdone for his taste – we ordered it medium rare, it came a bit closer to rare. Still, very tasty, with nice house-made sweet pickles and pickled carrots. Perfectly done fries. Definitely a good burger (although those onions on top would have been a bit underdone for my taste).Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzNote of cuteness that we appreciated: the letter “H” for “Hoffmann” is emblazoned on her pretzel rolls.For my entrée, I went with a special that night, a game hen cooked in the rotisserie, with spätzle (I took a chance!) with gruyere and chestnuts. The spätzle this time came under the chicken, and was very moist and flavorful – almost mushroomy. The dish tasted like Thanksgiving. The bird itself was gorgeous, spatchcocked, well-seasoned, and had a bit of frisee and pickled not-hot peppers strewn over the top.Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzNot only is “spatchcocked” a fun word to say at the table, it’s a great way to cook a bird for optimal all-around crispy skin.The BF said that he could see being a regular haunt for us (high praise from him). I agreed. The food was mostly wonderful, and cooked with care, especially on this second visit; the prices were decent; and the service warm and welcoming. We’ll be seeing you again, Hoffmann’s!Hoffmann’s Grill & Rotisserie1000 Guerrero St.San Francisco, CA 94110(415) 374-7479http://www.hoffmannsgrill.com/ Hoffmann’s Grill & Rotisserie is another place I reviewed over the holidays that hasn’t been around forever, and certainly isn’t what you’d call a dive. But it is owned by two very local women, Chef Karen Hoffmann and her partner Chandra Asken (by day, a computer scientist/fundraiser for the San Francisco Symphony, and by night, front-of-house/manager extraordinaire). Hoffmann’s has been around for a little over a year in this incarnation – it was called Company earlier and Hoffmann cooked there as well.Chef Hoffmann brought a rotisserie oven to the restaurant, which glows warmly and mesmerizingly behind the bar, along with her house-made breads, pasta, and sausage. There’s always a bird or two, or a roast of some sort on the rotisserie. This is a comfort food, neighborhood-y, casual place, and yet it has a definite upscale feel to it. Industrial warmth, perhaps, is what springs to mind. And you’d not be out of line to call it an American Bistro.Photo by Maria C. AscarrunzThe food isn’t dirt cheap, but it isn’t crazy either, and the portions are quite generous.center_img Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

73Unit Housing Coming to 19th and South Van Ness

Posted on

first_img 0% Another Mission District gas station will be turned into housing when the former Shell at 793 South Van Ness becomes 58 market-rate units and 15 affordable units as early as 2019. And if the first meeting related to the project is any indication, the opposition that usually accompanies market-rate housing in the Mission has not yet mounted a full offensive.Only four people attended a pre-application meeting held Monday night by the project’s developer, Joe Toboni, who is also behind the 27-unit development at the corner of 17th and South Van Ness that just broke ground last week and faced a much more contentious community meeting early last year.But besides an Inner Sunset resident involved in Mission politics — who left the meeting immediately, saying “I can’t sit in this meeting because it’s an illegitimate meeting without a member of the Planning Department” — the developers were allowed to present their plans uninterrupted. The next-door neighbors of the development, however, were concerned about the seven-story complex — which is taking advantage of a state law to add two stories above current height limits in exchange for adding additional affordable housing — overshadowing the top of their Victorian, where they occupy the third and fourth stories.“Two additional stories sounds pretty shitty, and if it affects our views or lighting we’ll be pretty upset,” said one of the neighbors, who wished to stay anonymous at the public meeting. “We bought the third and fourth floors anticipating we would have that view, so this is a pretty drastic change.”The two next-door neighbors were also worried about their driveway, half of which is technically on the property of the housing complex.“What happens to our driveway?” one said.“Basically nothing,” replied Ian Birchall, the principal architect for the project.“You get to use five feet of his property for your driveway,” said Steve Vettel, Toboni’s lawyer and a prominent land use attorney often representing private developers.And though Mission activists did not make a showing to raise the affordability question, one of the nearby residents was interested in her future neighbors, asking “How premium are these units going to be?”Toboni did not give exact prices, saying he would see what the rents at his 17th and South Van Ness project penned out to before deciding on these, but was unabashed about their luxury status. “They’re going to be high-end,” Toboni said. His development company, the Toboni Group, describes itself as a builder of “luxury development” and has a portfolio mostly consisting of single-family homes. Vettel said the development would be using a state density bonus — rather than the proposed city density bonus —  to up the number of affordable units on-site in exchange for the extra stories. By making 20 percent of its units below-market-rate — instead of the 12 percent required by city law — the project will be able to build 73 units where it otherwise would have built 54. That more than doubles its affordable units from six under the old plan to 15 under the current one. Toboni originally planned to use the city’s proposed affordable housing density bonus law, which would have required 30 percent on-site affordable housing for the extra two stories. That housing is aimed at a higher income level — up to 140 percent of area median income, or about $100,000 for a single-person household — while the currently envisioned housing will be reserved for those making less than 55 percent of area median income, or about $39,000 for one person.Because the city law is tied up at the Planning Commission and its future remains uncertain, Toboni decided to begin development using the state law instead. “The state law is on more stable ground,” Toboni said.The project will be mostly one-bedrooms at 675 to 800 square feet and two-bedrooms at 800 to 1200 square feet, with two three-bedroom units at 1400 square feet. The market-rate units will be condos owned by Toboni but rented out, while the below-market-rate units will be rentals managed by the Mayor’s Office of Housing. Two ground floor retail spaces are also planned, one with 494 square feet facing 19th Street, and another with 3792 square feet facing South Van Ness, which could be divided into two spots. A ground-floor parking lot with 41 spaces will occupy the back of the building, and because the complex does away with the curb cuts of the gas station, it will result in more street parking on the block.The corner at 19th and South Van Ness has been vacant for more than 10 years after the gas station there shut down in 2004. Plans to develop a more modest 29-unit housing complex started in 2005 but were delayed by the 2008 economic crisis. Since then, its developers have amped up the original project to the current 73 units and are in the process of obtaining a Large Project Authorization for the bigger development. The Planning Commission should weigh in on the project sometime this fall, and if there are no significant delays — never certain in the Mission — construction could begin in 2017 and be finished a year and a half later.Correction: An earlier version of this story stated that the Joe Toboni has no other apartment complexes. In fact, he built a 40-unit complex at 4770 Mission St. in 1989 with mostly tenants who receive Section 8 vouchers. center_img Tags: housing • south van ness avenue Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

Bringing the News To You

Posted on

first_img 0% Joe Rivano Barros is at housing meetings, fires and homeless sweeps. On Thursday he moderated a debate featuring the four candidates for District 9 Supervisor and along with the rest of the staff, he fact checked their answers.Yep, like all of our reporters, he’s tireless.Few other neighborhoods have a staff dedicated to bringing residents the news, and Mission Local won’t continue without your help. Don’t wait – it may be too late. Become a member today.  Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

SF Bayviews new police captain sees appointment as a homecoming

Posted on

first_img 0% Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% Covering the Police is a collaboration with UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism.Capt. Steven Ford calls his appointment to lead the Bayview Police Station a homecoming. Not just because the Bayview was Ford’s first post after his field training in 1991, but because his parents grew up on its streets in the 1940s — his mother on Navy Road in Hunters Point, and his father on Connecticut Street in Potrero Hill.“I know this district like the palm of my hand; It’s my old stomping ground,” he said recently in his office at the Bayview police station, where his desk is covered with papers he needs to sign and overtime cards he needs to approve. His cell phone dings every few minutes. But Ford presides over what could feel like a scene of disorder with utter calm. He is precise with his words and movements. He has to be. On top of leading the Bayview station, he teaches night courses at City College and attends class every other weekend to work on his doctorate in educational leadership. For him, each minute must be productive. center_img “I’m very regimented,” he said. Ford is solidly built, which he maintains by waking up at 4 a.m. almost every day to go to the gym. His diet is carefully considered, and has recently been pared down to plants, with the addition of egg whites and occasional fish. He used to be a bodybuilder and still attends shows and picks up tips from his friends who lift.“One thing I don’t do,” he said, peering up from his reading glasses. “I don’t engage in negative interactions.”The 26-year-veteran is still formulating his plans for the Bayview, but he’s already hit the pavement to speak to merchants, community groups and faith-based organizations. He plans to review statistical data to consider where to invest resources. It’s clear that Ford is not going to be rushed. He takes a methodical approach that reflects an academic bent — he picked up a master’s degree in emergency services and administration and is now earning his doctorate.ADVERTISEMENT 5 Below Market Rate (BMR) Rental Apartments available at 3000 23rd St., San Francisco, CA 94110. Applications must be received by 5PM, Nov. 7, 2017, and must either be submitted online here or mailed in with a self-addressed stamped envelope to: 3000 23rd St. BMR, P.O. Box 420847, San Francisco, CA 94124. Applications available here or picked up from an agency listed here.Nevertheless, he understands that building trust in the community will come down to making himself visible and his office accessible. “Through accessibility, the message will get out that Capt. Ford is here to assist and be a resource,” he said. “I’m going to be very diligent about identifying our successes, and I know I need to be the one that meets with community people.”But the relationship between police and the community in Bayview is not so straightforward. The Bayview is home to much of the city’s dwindling black population, against whom the SFPD has a disproportionate record of using excessive and lethal use of force. Last year, the Department of Justice was invited to San Francisco after a string of officer-involved shootings — the last two of which were were of black people in the Bayview.Since his early days as a beat officer in Bayview, Ford’s extensive career has given him a thorough tour of the San Francisco Police Department. He’s patrolled from the north to south of the city, worked on criminal, background and burglary investigations, and staffed the department’s Homeland Security Unit. But he said that the six years he spent in Internal Affairs, investigating misconduct in the SFPD, were the most important in his career.“It was the first time I understood the importance of managing personnel,” he said. “In the law enforcement arena, personnel issues can have a huge impact if not managed correctly.” Ford won’t go into the specifics, but said he saw the gamut of penalties imposed, from a verbal reprimand to termination.“The underbelly of discipline is to hold people accountable,” he said. And in his last position — before he was promoted to Captain on Oct. 21 — Ford was, in a way, helping impose department-wide discipline, overseeing the implementation of the 272 recommendations from the Department of Justice. “I think the Department of Justice report was a fair assessment,” Ford said, quickly amending his statement to emphasize that that is his personal opinion. Ford chooses his words so prudently that it is hard to recognize anything personal at all.“I know not everyone felt as positively about it,” he adds. “But in this day of 21st-century policing, it is most important for us to be transparent, and the Department of Justice has created a sense of transparency,” he said, giving a nod to former President Barak Obama’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing, which promoted community policing and de-escalation tactics over supplying local law enforcement agencies with military-grade weaponry. Ford said he will foster community policing in the Bayview.Right before Ford took over the district, his predecessor, Capt. Raj Vaswani, had pledged to double the foot-patrol presence in the Bayview by November. It’s unclear if that goal has been met, Ford said, but he’s committed to it.“Foot beats are the best way to implement community policing strategies,” he said, “because of the up close and personal nature of their work.” last_img read more

VIDEO Closing arguments will begin in SF immigrants murder trial

Posted on

first_imgThis piece was produced by Zoe Ferrigno and shot by J.P. Dobrin and Charlotte Silver.The trial for a murder that put San Francisco at the center of a national debate about immigration is nearing its end. On July 1, 2015, Jose Ines Garcia Zarate — an undocumented immigrant with a criminal past and history of deportations — shot and killed Kate Steinle on San Francisco’s waterfront. For the past three weeks, the district attorney’s office and Garcia Zarate’s attorneys have been fighting to convince a jury that the shooting was either in cold blood or a tragic accident. Closing arguments in the trial are set for Monday, Nov. 20. 0% Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

SAINTS return to First Utility Super League action

Posted on

first_imgSAINTS return to First Utility Super League action this Friday when they travel to Leeds Rhinos.It will be the fourth time the two sides have met this season with the Champions yet to record a victory.But Cunningham’s men have had an extended break and are looking forward to the contest.“The players have had a short break but we have been working hard in the office,” Keiron said. “They did some tough work at the back end of the week and then had the weekend off. We had them back in Monday and today (Tuesday) and they looked good for the rest.“The break has probably been good for us. We played in the World Club Challenge and through to the Challenge Cup Semi Final so the only week we have missed this season has been the final. We have had a hangover since the semi-final and haven’t been at the races.“We haven’t been far off though. If we defend a try against Huddersfield we go on to win the game. Against Hull FC if we score another try in the first half we go on to win that and that was the same situation in Catalan. We are close but we know we have to do better.“People seem quite dour about the situation we are in, our season is over, derailed etc but we’re happy if people think that. We want to be underdogs and be written off so we can wipe the smirk from a few people’s faces.“We want to be involved in the big games and finals but as much as you feel you deserve to be involved in them, you have to earn the right to be there. We are coming to terms with that as a club.”The task that Saints face is a daunting one as they travel to Headingley and to the home of a side that hammered Hull KR to win the Challenge Cup Final for the second year in a row.They are top of the Super League table too…“They are certainly the benchmark in the competition,” Keiron continued. “There are a great team and are led by some great leaders. We have been in that situation too and at times you almost feel untouchable; if you have that many leaders you can take it for granted.“They are in a purple patch, playing good football and as a comp we have to try to catch up Leeds. But there’s always someone to catch!“Their back five is probably the best back five in the world and they have strike across the board. They play carefree and without structure and that makes them hard to defend against.“Quite simply you have to be in the game and stay with them to come out with a result.”Cunningham says Jon Wilkin has a good chance of returning this week providing he passes the relevant tests.As a “pivotal” player in the club, he will not play if he isn’t ready though according to the head coach.Tickets for the game – which kicks off at 8pm – are on sale from the Ticket Office at Langtree Park, by calling 01744 455 052 or online here.last_img read more

SAINTS have won on their last six visits to the Ha

Posted on

first_imgSAINTS have won on their last six visits to the Halliwell Jones Stadium with Warrington’s last home win coming in June 2011.Last Ten Meetings:St Helens 4, Warrington 26 (SLR17, 3/6/16)Warrington 22, St Helens 25 (SLR10, 8/4/16)St Helens 16, Warrington 32 (SLS8-R7, 24/9/15)Warrington 14, St Helens 20 (SLR22, 16/7/15)St Helens 20, Warrington 16 (SLR16, 31/5/15) (at St James’ Park, Newcastle)St Helens 32, Warrington 24 (SLR6, 19/3/15)St Helens 12, Warrington 39 (SLR26, 4/9/14)St Helens 24, Warrington 41 (SLR13, 18/5/14) (at Etihad Stadium, Manchester)Warrington 8, St Helens 38 (SLR1, 13/2/14)St Helens 16, Warrington 29 (SLR26, 30/8/13)Super League Summary:Warrington won 11 (includes win in 2012 play-offs)St Helens won 43 (includes wins in 2010 and 2012 play-offs)2 drawsHighs and Lows: Warrington highest score: 56-22 (H, 2001) (also widest margin)St Helens highest score: 72-2 (H, 2002) (also widest margin)Head to Head: SaintsWarringtonTries100120Goals8597Metres28,38431,366Breaks121140Tackles7,3307,224Penalties184160Club Milestones Involving Tonight’s Teams:Stefan Ratchford needs two tries to reach a career century of touchdowns. Ratchford has touched down 55 times for Warrington since 2012, to go with 40 tries for Salford (2007-2011).He has also scored 3 times for England Knights (2011-2012), and has 1 non-scoring appearance for England (2012).James Roby needs three tries to reach a career century of touchdowns. Roby has touched down 90 times for St Helens since 2004, to go with 7 tries for England (2008-2013 & 2015).He also has non-scoring appearances for Great Britain (2006-2007).Super League Milestones: (Players reaching significant figures in Super League games only, including play-offs & Super League Super 8s)Ben Currie – 1 appearance away from 100 (99 for Warrington, 2012-2016)Try-Scoring Runs:Warrington trio Daryl Clark (1-1-1), Ben Currie (1-1-1) and Stefan Ratchford (1-1-1) have all scored tries in their sides’ last three matches.Winning Runs: Warrington Wolves are undefeated in their last seven matches, having won six and drawn one.Their last loss was 19-12 at home to Hull FC on 10 June.St Helens have won their last five matches.Their last defeat was 33-16 at Catalans Dragons on 11 June.First Utility Super League Leading Scorers: Tries:1 Denny Solomona (Castleford Tigers) 282 Corey Thompson (Widnes Vikings) 203 Jodie Broughton (Catalans Dragons) 184 Jermaine McGillvary (Huddersfield Giants) 175 = Ryan Atkins (Warrington Wolves), Josh Charnley (Wigan Warriors) 157 Ben Currie (Warrington Wolves) 148 = Jamie Shaul (Hull FC), Junior Sa’u (Salford Red Devils), Dominic Manfredi (Wigan Warriors) 13Goals:1 Marc Sneyd (Hull FC) 942 Luke Gale (Castleford Tigers) 863 Liam Finn (Wakefield Trinity Wildcats) 744 Kurt Gidley (Warrington Wolves) 735 Pat Richards (Catalans Dragons) 696 Matty Smith (Wigan Warriors) 597 Danny Brough (Huddersfield Giants) 568 Rhys Hanbury (Widnes Vikings) 559 Luke Walsh (St Helens) 5410 Gareth O’Brien (Salford Red Devils) 51Goals Percentage:1 Thomas Bosc (Catalans Dragons) 87.50 (14/16)2 Jordan Lilley (Leeds Rhinos) 84.37 (27/32)3 Marc Sneyd (Hull FC) 83.92 (94/112)4 Kurt Gidley (Warrington Wolves) 80.21 (73/91)5 Luke Walsh (St Helens) 79.41 (54/68)6 Liam Finn (Wakefield Trinity Wildcats) 77.89 (74/95)7 Mark Percival (St Helens) 77.41 (24/31)8 Luke Gale (Castleford Tigers) 76.78 (86/112)9 Liam Sutcliffe (Leeds Rhinos) 76.74 (33/43)10 = Jamie Ellis (Huddersfield Giants), Ken Sio (Hull Kingston Rovers) 76.47 (13/17)Points:1 Marc Sneyd (Hull FC) 2052 Luke Gale (Castleford Tigers) 1893 Pat Richards (Catalans Dragons) 1744 Kurt Gidley (Warrington Wolves) 1705 Liam Finn (Wakefield Trinity Wildcats) 1566 Rhys Hanbury (Widnes Vikings) 1547 Matty Smith (Wigan Warriors) 1338 Danny Brough (Huddersfield Giants) 1329 Luke Walsh (St Helens) 11910 Gareth O’Brien (Salford Red Devils) 114last_img read more

Tropical Storm watch issued for NC coastlines

Posted on

first_img The low pressure area is not yet well defined, and considerable uncertainty remains with exactly how organized this system could become in the time remaining before it reaches our area.Potential wind impacts include damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds and items not tied down such as lawn chairs, patio furniture, etc. Some large limbs may break from trees and a few shallow rooted or weak trees may snap or be knocked down.A few roadways may become impassable due to flooding or debris.Related Article: Time to prepare as Hurricane Florence, takes aim at US SoutheastClick here for more information from the WWAY Hurricane Center 00:00 00:00 html5: Video file not foundhttps://cdn.field59.com/WWAY/931af6357caf91f2b552e06213de60ae0de285a4_fl9-720p.mp4 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% Are you a fan of dew points in the 60s? Well, they’re returning tomorrow.0:59Sweet summer day with sunny skies and warm temperatures0:40Tropical Update w/ Chief Meteorologist Scott Dean0:46WWAY 2019 Hurricane Special Part 17:30WWAY 2019 Hurricane Special Part 25:41WWAY 2019 Hurricane Special Part 34:07WWAY 2019 Hurricane Special Part 44:03NOAA releases 2019 hurricane season forecast0:48Hurricane Preparedness Week: Building your emergency kit3:452018 Hurricane Special Part 18:172018 Hurricane Special Part 24:412018 Hurricane Special Part 33:172018 Hurricane Special Part 45:192017 Hurricane Special: “Matthew’s Mark”20:392017 Cape Fear Preparedness & Safety Expo3:58XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) – A tropical Storm Watch has been issued for our area. The system is expected to move north along the coast of South and North Carolina Monday afternoon through Tuesday morning.Winds may increase to tropical storm force as the storm’s center moves by, with rainfall amounts six inches or greater possible.- Advertisement – last_img read more

Mayors from across North Carolina come together

Posted on

first_img 32 mayors from the largest cities, along with local leaders, enjoyed lunch at Bakery 105.The purpose of this annual conference is to identify issues in various areas in the community, prioritize them, and work together to accomplish them.Charlotte Mayor Vi Lyles said they hope to ensure the state is competitive in its efforts to bring good jobs to the state.Related Article: UNCW students return for another fall move-in“What I hope will come from today is that you’ll see how North Carolina is grounded and the people across our state, whether we live in a small town or a big city, we’re going to do things together,” Lyles said.One major item Mayor Lyles wants worked on in our state is film incentives.Lyles hopes with work our state continues to be recognized, adding that she thinks the state needs to create a more diverse economic base and a creative culture for that to happen. WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — Dozens of mayors from across North Carolina were in town Thursday afternoon for their annual conference.It’s called the Metro Mayors Coalition and it was held in downtown Wilmington.- Advertisement – last_img read more