What a Hurricane Taught Me About Being Stuck in a Nursing Home

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first_imgby, Jill Vitale-Aussem, GuestbloggerTweetShareShareEmail0 Shares  BEFORE AFTERIn September 2014, my husband and I were vacationing in Los Cabos, Mexico when Hurricane Odile, the strongest hurricane to ever hit the area, struck. After spending a terrifying night in the basement of the resort, we emerged into the sunlight to complete devastation. We spent the next four days at the demolished resort, with 300 other refugees, waiting to be evacuated. As I reflect back on this experience, I realize that the actions and behaviors of our refugee group bore a striking resemblance to what we often see in nursing homes, assisted living, and retirement communities. The plagues of loneliness, helplessness and boredom, along with their accompanying ‘behaviors’, were in full force after only a short period of time.When the initial shock of our situation wore off, some resort guests began picking up shovels and trying to help resort staff clean up the damage. We all wanted to feel like we could play a role in making the situation better. The General Manager informed us all that this was a liability issue and we must stop. We then truly felt helpless, unable to do anything to improve our situation. We realized then that we were completely dependent on the resort staff. How often do we put Elders in this same situation…  where in the name of safety, we take away the things that might give someone purpose or hope?All of us became obsessed with trying to talk with our families and we constantly pestered the staff, asking them when we could go home.  Even though it was fruitless, we wandered around with our cell phones, incessantly checking for a blip of service so we could connect with those we loved. We were no different than a displaced elder just wanting desperately to connect with something that feels familiar, that feels like home.Elders lining up and gathering an hour before meals is a common sight in an institution. This also happened during our time as refugees. Lunch was at 1:00 p.m. each day. By noon, we were all lined up and heading into the dining room. Meals were our only entertainment and the only time to connect with people. Our other choice was to sit alone in our rooms. Sound familiar?  And we’ve all seen the woman in a nursing home wrapping up food to sneak back to her room, right?  I had always thought that came from living through the depression but I’ve realized there is a deeper psychological need at play. Fueled by fears of running out of food and water, and having to trust total strangers to attend to our basic needs, I began hoarding bread, bringing a zip lock bag to meals with me so I would have a stockpile if our caretakers didn’t come through for us.As hours turned into days and we walked around like zombies just passing the time, I noticed that my thinking dulled considerably.  One day someone asked me what time it was.  I looked at my watch and told her with confidence that it was 3:15 p.m.   It was actually 9:15 in the morning. I didn’t even notice my error until she pointed it out to me.  How much of the cognitive loss we see in institutionalized Elders is actually due to circumstance rather than disease?Just as we see Elders ‘acting out’ their discomfort in many ways, each of us reacted differently to being displaced and in a situation we didn’t want to be in. I paced all day, unable to sit still. Another guest, who constantly told everyone he felt like he was in jail, walked from person to person trying to gear up a revolt against the management. One woman became so agitated that she threw her stash of bananas at her boyfriend and ran out of her room in the middle of the night, only to be brought back by three security guards. Others repeatedly tried to wander out of the safe area of the resort even though this was forbidden and they were putting themselves in harm’s way.If a bunch of 40 and 50-year-olds at a resort (albeit a demolished one) on the beach can feel the effects of institutional practices in only four days, what chance do Elders have in a traditional nursing home over a long period of time? We’ve come a long way in our field but we have a lot more work to do to create environments where people can actually thrive instead of just waiting out the days to be rescued and taken home.Related PostsTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: hurricane nursing homeslast_img read more

Ripening

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first_imgby, David Goff, ChangingAging ContributorTweet17Share115Share7Email139 SharesA report from the Slow Lane David “Lucky” GoffLife apparently thrives by occasionally knocking over the apple cart. Just when I think I have something figured out, I am plunged, once again, in over my head. Sometimes I think Life has a wicked sense of humor and is a bit sadistic. I usually occupy this sentiment when I am feeling sorry for myself. I’m not in that place now. So lately, in the midst of my unforeseen happiness, where I am feeling glad to be me, I have been reflecting on what is happening when I, and my world, get turned upside down. It looks like I am adopting a new attitude. It seems that these recurring dilemmas, as predictably unpredictable as they may be, are all part of a process that seems to be ripening me.The idea that I am being ripened appeals to me. I know that soon I am going to fall off the tree. I know, that despite all of my illusions, protestations and elaborate projects and schemes, the end is coming. I’ve stopped worrying about it. But, I am still curious. So the idea that I am being ripened, that I could be the seed pod for some, as yet undefined, new life form, intrigues me.Now bear in mind, as I am this minute, I am only speculating. I don’t really know anything. But, I keep imagining death as a form of transition, a shift from one form to another. In my mind, seeing death as a form of transition has a lot of explanatory value. Mainly, viewing things this way, makes the ordeals, the inconveniences of my life, the little broken edges, have more dignity. These recurring challenges are not a sign of my incompleteness; instead I am being ripened. Maybe I am being prepared, ripening like a wine grape in the sun, steeping like a good cup of tea, evolving like a caterpillar being chrysalized. The thought that even death is a part of evolution, that I could, once more, be becoming something else, fills me with a feeling that I am going deeper into the familiar, instead of being cast away, dried out, useless, and done.Thinking this way also helps me appreciate the difficulties that keep arising. They may actually be Nature’s way of shaping me into a new form, one that I cannot imagine but can intuit. I know I do better, I play the hand dealt to me, am more creative in my responses to Life, when I am anticipating becoming. I may not know where I am heading, may not have any idea about how I’m going to get anywhere, but I have a sense that I am moving, ripening, changing, becoming something else.This may be sheer delusion, certainly I have no science to back it up, but it still serves me. It seems to me that no matter what I believe, no matter how sophisticated I am with the scientific method, I still have to come to terms with the great inscrutable mystery of death. And, it also seems to me, that how I come to terms with death determines how I come to terms with Life. I live according to the way I envision death.Ripening offers me a chance to participate, not like I alone hold the key to my fate. I am prepared to be alone, to take responsibility for this life, actually, I think ripening demands it. But, ripening, becoming, implies yet another stage, in another, I would say, greater context. I seem to be part of some larger, as yet unknown, ecosystem. If this is true, and in my current imagination it is, then there is this strange other, that I am part of, but that is unknown. I am simultaneously the new seed arriving and the old ecosystem receiving it. In my mind, I am being prepared to quicken a greater wholeness.Death, in this line of thought, isn’t the end of the line, it is some kind of timely ripening. As the caterpillar entering the chrysalis, or a pupae becoming an adult, there is a change of states. The timing is semi-predictable, and the general direction is assured. Despite the Second Law of Thermodynamics, the energy in the Universe doesn’t seem to be running down, instead the Universe seems to confound us by conserving, even increasing its energy. Death may be another expansion of the Universe.Ripening is a mysterious phenomenon for me. For instance it seems to happen by virtue of a combination of circumstances. There seems to be something inside that matures. And, while that is happening, there also seems to be something outside that provides the necessary stimulation. Ripening, to me, is a co-creative process. This thought thrills me. Maybe, by ripening, accepting the unacceptable turns on this thrill ride of life, going into the darkness of Mystery, and dying as I live, I get a little closer to the source of all this complex stimulation.If this is true, wow, am I glad to be alive and to get to die! If it is a delusion, a fantasy of my own making, then I’m merely glad I had imagination enough to create an interesting way of life.I hope you do too.Related PostsYou’re Perfect The Way You AreI am becoming more capable of something I could only dream of before. Instead of seeing everything in terms of either/or, I am much more capable of both/and awareness. I am ripening into a more complex awareness, that lets me see that I (like everyone else) am like Creation.CeremonyI’ve been captivated these last few weeks by grief and a growing sense that the quality of my life, perhaps of all life, depends in large part upon a relationship with death.Surrendering AttachmentI used to hear Johnny Cash sing, “now that I am old enough to finally live, I’m old enough to die.” The poignancy of that reality is kicking my butt.Tweet17Share115Share7Email139 SharesTags: deathlast_img read more

Fujitsu announces development of molecular simulation technology for drug discovery

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first_imgMay 7 2018Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and Fujitsu Limited today announced the development of molecular simulation technology for drug discovery that can accurately estimate binding affinity, which represents the degree to which proteins that can cause diseases (target proteins) bind to chemical substances that could become candidate drugs.In the process of drug discovery, there is a demand for accurate prediction of the binding affinity between target proteins and chemical substances, which offers a rough estimate of a drug’s efficacy. Molecular simulation technology has been widely used in the past as a method of predicting binding affinity, calculating the approximate forces that arise between atoms in molecules using Newtonian mechanics. The problem with this method, however, remains that the low degree accuracy of its estimation of the most important parameters-the degree of torsion at the binding sites. This means that the accuracy of its estimation of the overall binding affinity is also poor.Now, Fujitsu Laboratories has developed molecular simulation technology that estimates the degree of torsion in a chemical substance, which is directly connected to the predicted binding affinity. The new technology not only takes into account the bonding location where the torsion will occur, but also the impact of neighboring atoms.Fujitsu Laboratories evaluated this technology for 190 types of chemical substances, comparing the results with correct results arrived at from first principles calculation and then evaluating the error rate. Upon doing so, it was able to confirm that the error rate in the estimate of the degree of torsion was, on average, one-tenth that of previous technology. It is anticipated that the use of this new technology in IT-based drug discovery, with its ability to accurately estimate the binding affinity of targeted proteins and chemical substances, offers the potential for groundbreaking new drug discovery efforts that could not be achieved with previous approaches.Fujitsu Laboratories plans to include this technology in a new IT-based drug discovery service offered by Fujitsu Limited.Development BackgroundThe discovery of new drugs requires significant expenses and timeframes that can be measured in decades, leading to a global search for new methods of discovering drugs. One of the methods that has received considerable interest is IT-based drug discovery, a new drug discovery method using computers that makes it possible to create chemical substances as candidates for novel drugs with a high probability of success. IT-based drug discovery has become a focal point for expectations as a groundbreaking technology for the creation of new drugs, because unlike previous methods of trial and error, in which chemical substances are repeatedly created and tested, this approach makes it possible to virtually design chemical substances and estimate their effects.IssuesThe effects of a chemical substance as a drug are expressed when the chemical substance binds to a target protein. When the chemical substance binds to the target protein, it can change its shape in line with that of the target protein. The degree of deformation, namely, the parameters that indicate the extent of this shape change, is directly connected to the binding affinity of the substance and the protein, and gives a rough idea of its effect as a drug. Given this, there is a strong demand for the ability to accurately predict this value. To calculate the degree of deformation of a chemical substance, there are methods based on quantum mechanics and methods based on Newtonian mechanics. Quantum-mechanics based first principles calculation enables extremely accurate calculations, resolving the states of electrons from the types and positions of the atoms involved. On the other hand, however, the ability of first principles to perform exacting calculations necessarily leads to massive time required to complete the calculations. In order to simulate the degree of deformation for numerous chemical substances, time required is in the order of years, making this method impractical. On the other hand, approximate calculations based on molecular simulations are extremely fast, using Newtonian mechanics to calculate the forces between the atoms within the molecules, and can even handle large molecules like proteins quite easily. Consequently, this method is widely used. With Newtonian mechanics, the forces between the atoms are expressed in the following manner:Related StoriesInhibition of p38 protein boosts formation of blood vessels in colon cancerResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CT1. As a force that depends on the distance between two atoms bonded to each other2. A force that relies on the angles between three atoms bonded to each other3. A force that relies on the degree of torsion in the bond, and4. A force that relies on the distance between atoms that are not bonded.Among these, when a chemical substance is bound to a target protein, the degree of torsion of the bond represents the important degree of deformation. With existing technology, however, the accuracy of the estimation of the dihedral angle parameter, which is necessary to calculate the degree of torsion of the bond, is quite low, resulting in the problem of low accuracy in the estimation of the affinity of the bond in the simulation.About the Newly Developed TechnologyFujitsu Laboratories has been developing molecular simulation technology for more than ten years. Now, using the knowledge it obtained through previous efforts, Fujitsu Laboratories has developed a molecular simulation technology that can estimate the dihedral angle parameter by taking into consideration the impact of atoms near the bond. Existing technology estimates the dihedral angle parameter based on a total of four atoms-the two atoms in the relevant bond, and the other atoms each of those atoms was bonded to. Depending on the structure of the molecule, however, there are cases where atoms beyond those four could have a significant impact, and in those cases, the margin of error of the estimation could be quite large. With this technology, Fujitsu Laboratories has created a database of estimation formulas for partial structure patterns where the impact of atoms further away from the bond site could be significant, as well as for the degree of torsion of chemical substances that would be expected in that case. Using the relevant estimation formula to find the degree of torsion in the case of molecules corresponding to the database for partial structures, it has become possible to even make highly accurate estimations for molecular torsion, which was previously difficult to calculate accurately.When Fujitsu Laboratories integrated this technology into the software it had developed for generating sophisticated parameters for the forces between atoms (FF-FOM), it was able to confirm that the results conformed to accurate computations.EffectsWhen Fujitsu Laboratories evaluated the difference between the results of this technology and the results of a calculation from first principles for the estimation of the degree of torsion with 190 types of chemical substances, it was less than one-tenth that of the previous technology, on average, 0.6 kcal/mol below room temperature thermal fluctuations, confirming that the new technology is practical. Because it can accurately estimate the binding affinity of target proteins and chemical substances, it is expected that the use of this technology will lead to the creation of groundbreaking new drugs through its use in IT-based drug discovery.Future PlansFujitsu Laboratories plans to include this technology in an IT-based drug discovery-related service that Fujitsu Limited plans to offer in the future.Source: http://www.fujitsu.com/global/about/resources/news/press-releases/2018/0507-02.htmllast_img read more

Skin responsible for uptake of cancercausing compounds during barbecuing than lungs

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first_img Source:https://www.acs.org/ May 23 2018With summer coming, it’s only a matter of time before the smells and tastes of barbecued foods dominate the neighborhood. But there’s a downside to grilling that can literally get under your skin. In a study appearing in Environmental Science & Technology, scientists report that skin is a more important pathway for uptake of cancer-causing compounds produced during barbecuing than inhalation. They also found that clothing cannot fully protect individuals from this exposure.Related StoriesLoose double-stranded RNA molecules spur skin rejuvenationUranium toxicity might have caused obesity and diabetes in Kuwait, finds new studyResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairIn the U.S., 70 percent of adults own a grill or a smoker, and more than half of them grill at least four times a month, according to the Barbecue Industry Association. But barbecuing produces large amounts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs. These carcinogenic compounds can cause respiratory diseases and DNA mutations. Eating grilled foods is the most common source of PAHs arising from barbecuing. However, according to a previous study by Eddy Y. Zeng and colleagues, bystanders near barbecues were likely exposed to considerable amount of PAHs through skin exposure and inhalation, even if they didn’t eat the grilled foods. Building on that study, the team sought to more precisely quantify skin uptake of PAHs from barbecue fumes and particles.The researchers divided volunteers into groups at an outdoor barbecue to provide them with varying degrees of exposure to the food and the smoke. After analyzing urine samples from the volunteers, the researchers concluded that, as expected, diet accounted for the largest amount of PAH exposure. However, the skin was the second-highest exposure route, followed by inhalation. They say oils in barbecue fumes likely enhance skin uptake of PAHs. The team also found that while clothes may reduce skin exposure to PAHs over the short term, once clothing is saturated with barbecue smoke, the skin can take in considerable amounts of PAHs from them. They suggest washing clothes soon after leaving a grilling area to reduce exposure.last_img read more

Physicians test technique to preserve potency in men undergoing prostate cancer therapy

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first_img Source:https://www.utsouthwestern.edu/newsroom/articles/year-2018/potency.html Jun 13 2018″Will treatment make me impotent?” It’s a question on the minds of many men as they are making decisions about prostate cancer treatment. A multicenter clinical trial being led by UT Southwestern physicians is testing a technique for sparing nerve bundles and arteries involved in sexual function to preserve potency in patients getting radiation therapy for prostate cancer.”Nowadays, mortality after treatment for localized prostate cancer is as low as 1 percent at 10 years,” said Dr. Neil Desai, Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology, a Dedman Family Scholar in Clinical Care, and Principal Investigator of the POTEN-C trial. “By contrast, as many as half of all patients being treated for prostate cancer will experience some decline in sexual function. It is appropriate, therefore, that our focus has shifted to this aspect of quality of life.”The new technique being tested involves reducing the dose of radiation on one side of the prostate, where imaging shows no cancer, in order to spare nerves and blood vessels on that side. To achieve this goal, patients in the study will be treated with a highly precise form of radiation called stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SAbR), and a spacer gel (SpaceOAR) will be placed between the rectum and prostate, which may help reduce the radiation dose to nerve bundles involved in sexual function. Half the patients in the study will be randomly assigned to the new radiation technique with reduced dosage on one side and half will receive standard SAbR.Kevin Stanfield of Mount Vernon, Texas, said he became a detective, scoping out all the options – watch-and-wait surveillance, surgery, radiation – when he learned he had prostate cancer, which had taken his grandfather’s life. Radiation and participation in the POTEN-C trial were the options Mr. Stanfield chose.”The potency was a big deal,” said Mr. Stanfield. “It’s not that I’m some sort of Romeo or anything, but my wife is a few years younger than me. We enjoy our time together.”Mr. Stanfield will be one of 120 patients enrolled in the study, which will include patients at up to nine major medical center sites. All patients in the study will be followed for two years. UT Southwestern will lead the clinical trial. Hear Mr. Stanfield discuss his journey.Related StoriesRadiation associated with increased risk of adverse cardiac events in lung cancer patientsResearchers develop novel imaging test to predict immunotherapy response in kidney cancerRadiation-induced vascular damage could be treated with IL-1 inhibitorsThe POTEN-C trial builds on prior work done at UT Southwestern Medical Center, which is recognizing its 75th year in 2018.Dr. Robert Timmerman, Professor of Radiation Oncology and Neurological Surgery, has been at the forefront of national efforts to advance stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, or high-intensity, high-precision radiation therapy in prostate cancer. SAbR means fewer radiation treatments for patients as well as less damage to healthy tissue, and it has become standard treatment in many situations. Dr. Timmerman holds the Effie Marie Cain Distinguished Chair in Cancer Therapy Research.UT Southwestern also was part of clinical trials proving the value of the biodegradable spacer gel SpaceOAR that is used to protect the rectum from damage during radiation treatment for prostate cancer.The POTEN-C trial incorporates both prior projects, culminating in what Dr. Desai hopes will be a way to reduce the burden of therapy on men and their partners. “We’re using advances in MRI imaging to locate the disease, the SAbR technique’s precision, and now the SpaceOAR gel to plan a new approach to reducing sexual dysfunction. We are excited to be able to combine the results from the last 10 years of research to improve the outlook for our patients who require prostate cancer treatment.”Mr. Stanfield said he realizes as a participant in a blinded randomized study, there’s no guarantee he will get the nerve bundle-sparing technique, but that doesn’t bother him. “I might get the new treatment or I might not; however, if I don’t I will still get the best that’s available now. I’m really excited about being a part of this,” he said.”Basically, we’re trying to give men more choices, trying to preserve their potency up front. If this ends up being a positive trial, it’s a pretty big deal for our field,” Dr. Desai said.last_img read more

Specific protein promotes processes associated with cancer aggressiveness reports study

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first_img Source:https://www.shinshu-u.ac.jp/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Aug 31 2018Japanese researchers have revealed for the first time that a specific protein plays a critical role in the development and metastasis of highly aggressive prostate and breast cancer cells.The study reports that large amounts of the fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5), a kind of transport protein for fatty acids, promotes processes associated with cancer aggressiveness such as cell growth, invasiveness, survival and inflammation in prostate and breast cancer cells. The researchers point out that a better understanding of the molecular pathways of specific cancers is a step in the direction of finding more effective therapeutic targets.Altered fatty acid metabolism is thought to be a hallmark of cancer. It is known that cancer cells exhibit significantly increased demands for energy, mass, and large molecules to keep multiplying and spreading as part of their metastatic behavior. It has also recently been revealed that alterations of lipid metabolism play pivotal roles in cancer development and metastasis. Furthermore, although cancer cells with high levels of lipid droplets (LDs) are more resistant to chemotherapy, the molecular mechanisms behind this remain unclear. Therefore, it is very important to identify the critical genes involved in metabolic reprogramming and regulation of LDs formation during carcinogenesis to develop novel diagnostic tools and treatments for cancers.Professor Hiroshi Fujii, Vice-Director of the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Shinshu University and the project lead, adds that he and his team have “demonstrated that there is a specific pathway behind FABP5 inflammation as well as production of immune substances in specific cancer cells. Therefore, FABP5 could be expected to be a target for development of therapeutic reagents and/or a biomarker for prostate and breast cancers in the future.”Related StoriesHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsCancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells identifiedTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerThe process of lipid metabolism includes events such as lipogenesis, lipid storage as well as degradation. Any irregularities in lipid metabolism in cancer cells are frequently detected and used as an indicator for tumor malignancy. Fatty acids, in particular, are involved in several aspects of the formation of tumors.The research team used several methods to reveal how FABP5 expression levels affect the genes that are involved in crucial processes of aggressive prostate and breast cancer cells.The authors also add that, “Understanding the alterations of lipid metabolism in cancer cells has important implications for exploring a new therapeutic strategy for treatment of cancer. For example, cholesterol ester and fatty acids (FAs) are required as an energy source and for production of cellular signaling molecules and the formation of membrane components during cancer cell proliferation and metastasis.”The study was published in BBA – Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids in June 2018. The researchers used standard molecular biology methods to obtain their results and show that certain genes are upregulated (or “turned on”) by FABP5 expression. These genes are changed in several crucial processes during multiplication and division of aggressive cancer cells.The authors state that while in the current study they have revealed that FABP5 might regulate lipid quality and/or quantity, but that the details of molecular mechanisms of metabolic reprogramming of lipids mediated by FABP5 are yet to be fully understood.Professor Fujii adds that, “Studies on analyses of lipid droplet contents should be needed to reveal alterations of lipid profiling induced by FABP5 in cancer cells in the future.”last_img read more

Gene involved in circadian rhythms can be potential target for glioblastoma treatment

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first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 11 2018Scientists with the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute say a gene involved in the body’s circadian rhythms is a potential target for therapies to help patients with a deadly form of brain cancer known as glioblastoma.This discovery, to be published in the journal Scientific Reports on Tuesday, Sept. 11, points to a subtype of a particular gene that apparently is enabling the survival of cancer cells, although it is more commonly associated with circadian rhythms — the body’s 24-hour biological clock.”The world is desperately seeking new treatments for glioblastoma and no one has ever before pointed to this gene as a target upon which to base therapies,” said Zhi Sheng, an assistant professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, whose team pinpointed the gene from 20 suspects it had previously identified.”We have found that inhibiting this gene may inhibit cancer stem cells from renewing themselves and differentiating into glioblastoma cells, which we suspect may be a hallmark of this very persistent cancer,” said Sheng, who is also an assistant professor of Internal Medicine at the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine. “More research is needed before a treatment can be designed, but our early, basic science results are promising.”Related StoriesLiving with advanced breast cancerRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskNew therapies for glioblastoma patients are desperately needed, according to Sheng, who led the study.Most patients do not live more than about 15 months after diagnosis. About 90 percent of patients who live longer than two years develop recurrent tumors, for which an additional brain surgery is often not a treatment option. The disease, which accounts for almost half of all brain cancers, recently claimed the life of U.S. Sen. John McCain.Sheng says the cancer can recur if only a few hundred glioblastoma stem cells survive after surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.However, in their experiments, carried out in cell cultures and in a laboratory mouse model of glioblastoma as described in Scientific Reports, the researchers determined when an enzyme produced by a member of the casein kinase 1 gene family is blocked, the proliferation of glioblastoma stem cells stops and tumor formation in mice is inhibited.The researchers found evidence to show the enzyme is regulating the glioblastoma stem cells effectiveness at self-renewal, rather than differentiation.”Blocking this gene effectively killed cancer stem cells,” Sheng said.Sheng and his colleagues also evaluated two commercially available drugs that block casein kinase 1 gene from activating circadian rhythms, with one showing some potential for further investigation as a chemical inhibitor of glioblastoma stem cells.Researchers involved in the study included Debbie Kelly, an associate professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, who is a leading researcher in structural oncology.​Source: https://vt.edu/last_img read more

Slideshow Ancient Mule Deer Journey Surprises Scientists

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A herd of mule deer has been discovered making an epic migration in Wyoming, scientists announced today—one that is the longest journey of any mule deer population. Biologists believe the animals are following paths thousands of years old, despite having to skirt highways, fences, and residential areas. The 500- to 1000-member herd of ungulates, whose distinctive large ears give them their name, depart the state’s Red Desert at the beginning of spring each year. They follow the greening of the grass and retreating snow to reach the Hoback Basin and surrounding mountains, south of Jackson, 240 kilometers away. Along the way, the animals join another 4000 to 5000 mule deer, says Hall Sawyer, a research biologist with Western Ecosystems Technology Inc., a private company in Laramie, Wyoming. The deer form a train and wind their way through sagebrush canyons, swim rivers, and dash across roads to reach the mountains. Sawyer has tracked the migration for the Bureau of Land Management since January 2011. At the time, biologists thought the deer stayed in the desert year-round. Sawyer’s team equipped 40 deer with GPS collars to collect each animal’s location every 3 hours. He returned in the spring to see how his study animals were faring—but the deer were nowhere to be found. Only after considerable “head-scratching and flying,” Sawyer says, did the researchers find the deer. In the process, they also discovered the animals’ remarkable migration. Sawyer and photographer Joe Riis followed the deer over the next 2 years to document the mule deer’s annual journey—and the obstacles they face as they travel their ancient path through modern America. read more

Presidents science adviser attacks COMPETES bill in US House raises concern about

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first_imgThe COMPETES bill has been widely assailed by the U.S. scientific community since a truncated version first appeared 2 years ago. The panel’s chair, Representative Lamar Smith (R–TX), has said he took that criticism to heart in drafting the current bill, which is meant to succeed a 2007 law, extended in 2010, that expired in 2013.Holdren indirectly acknowledged some of those changes in his comments. But he made it clear that he thinks the bill, which would significantly reduce authorized funding levels for the social and earth sciences at the National Science Foundation (NSF) and make changes in NSF’s grantsmaking process, is still seriously flawed.“The introductory language is great, but the contents are less great,” Holdren explained. “The bill singles out for quite aggressive cuts at NSF’s social and behavioral sciences. Some in Congress appear to believe that social and behavioral science is not really science, despite the 1950 organic act makes clear that progress in all fields of science, including the social and behavioral sciences, is the foundation’s mission.”“The bill also makes quite substantial cuts in the earth sciences. There are some in Congress who question whether earth science is really science,” he said. “I find that quite bizarre.”Challenges at NASAHoldren was more restrained in discussing the NASA reauthorization, which the panel began marking up at 11 a.m., barely 1 hour after Holdren ended his talk. At 1:36 p.m., the committee passed the bill (H.R. 2039) on a straight party-line vote of 19 to 15.“Another challenge is to how reconcile the administration and congressional priorities for NASA,” Holdren noted. “I’ve long said that the big problem with NASA is that it is trying to fit 20 pounds of missions into a 10-pound budget. NASA has an enormously diverse array of responsibilities … and its $18 billion budget, which may seem large, has never been enough to do what is desirable in all those domains.” But Holdren said the proposed legislation’s proposed large cut in authorized funding levels for the agency’s earth sciences program “is not the direction we need to be going.”Speaking to ScienceInsider after his talk, Holdren said that he would welcome a chance to talk with Republican legislators about making changes in the bill. “My hope is that we’ll find room for compromise. But it’s going to take a lot of work.” He declined to say whether he would prefer to see no bill enacted rather than the current legislation, but acknowledged that “there are good things that would be lost” if the bills were not adopted.*Clarification, 30 April, 2:50 p.m.: This story has been updated to clarify that today was the first time the White House commented on the COMPETES bill. 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Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img The president’s science adviser today criticized science policy legislation moving through the U.S. House of Representatives, hinting that his boss would veto the two bills if they ever reached his desk.Speaking at the annual Forum on Science and Technology Policy sponsored by AAAS (publisher of ScienceInsider), John Holdren had harsh words for the America COMPETES Act approved last week by the House science committee. He also expressed concern about a bill being marked up today by the science committee to reauthorize NASA programs. It’s the first comment on either bill by the White House, which typically refrains from taking an official position on legislation until it is scheduled for a vote by the full House or Senate.“In my personal opinion, the COMPETES bill as it now stands is bad for science, it’s bad for scientists and engineers, bad for the federal science agencies, and damaging to the world-leading U.S. scientific enterprise,” Holdren told the Washington, D.C., audience. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Climate change could eventually claim a sixth of the worlds species

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first_imgUp to one-sixth of the species on Earth could disappear if climate change remains on its current course, according to a new analysis of more than 100 smaller studies.“All the studies are in pretty good agreement: The more warming we have, the more species we’ll lose,” says Dov Sax, a conservation biologist at Brown University who was not involved in the work. “This is really important to know, from a policy viewpoint.”Industrial emissions of carbon dioxide and other planet-warming greenhouse gases have boosted the global average temperature about 0.8°C (1.44°F) since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. But studies have disagreed about what impact the rise is having on the world’s species, says Mark Urban, an ecologist at the University of Connecticut, Storrs. Some have estimated that as many as 54% of species could eventually become extinct as a result of climate change, but others have suggested no significant impact. Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Such disparate results might stem from the limited nature of some individual studies, possibly because they focused only on a few species or a relatively small geographical region, Urban says. And different teams have often used different methods to come up with their predictions. To address these limits, Urban used statistical methods to help blend the results of previous studies into an apples-to-apples comparison that estimates the risk of extinction for species worldwide.He chose to analyze only the results of studies that had assessed extinction risks for more than one species, a restriction that narrowed the pool to 131. Then he delved into the details, such as the regions in which the studies had taken place, the types of species considered, whether those species were limited to one small region or were widely dispersed, and whether the species were free to move as climate changed or were blocked by barriers such as mountain ranges, deforestation, or urban development. Finally, he weighted the results of the studies to give more statistical importance to those that assessed extinction risks for larger numbers of species.Effects of climate change aren’t always immediate, Urban says, and the risks of extinction he’s estimated are the long-term results of species not being able to find suitable habitat. Maybe the habitat will merely shrink to a size that can’t support the species, or maybe it will disappear entirely. In some cases, he notes, a species might not be able to outpace the shift in its range, dying out before it can reach a new homeland. For instance, some plants and animals disperse so slowly over the generations that rapid warming might kill them or their offspring off before they can spread to a suitable new habitat.At present, about 2.8% of the species on Earth are at risk of extinction due to climate change that has already occurred, Urban says. If the global average temperature rises and then holds at 2°C above the preindustrial average (a level that many scientists think is no longer achievable in view of estimates of future greenhouse gas emissions), then 5.2% might eventually die out. If global temperatures eventually top out at 4.3°C above preindustrial levels, as some studies suggest they will, climate change may ultimately claim one species out of every six, Urban reports online today in Science.Results of the new study may help researchers and policymakers better assess areas to be set aside for parks and preserves. An area set aside to preserve the species in an ecosystem today may become ecologically unsuitable decades from now, Sax notes, so it’s necessary to think ahead. For example, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a closely connected group of marine sanctuaries or other protected habitats can create migration corridors for marine life responding to climate change.Urban “has done a rigorous job of melding the results of these studies,” says Janneke Hille Ris Lambers, an ecologist at the University of Washington, Seattle. The work, she says, also provides an opportunity for scientists to design future studies to fill in current gaps in knowledge. Sax agrees: “We’re just at the beginning of assessing these risks.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

How bighorn sheep use crowdsourcing to find food on the hoof

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first_imgHow bighorn sheep use crowdsourcing to find food on the hoof Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country If you’re a hungry human, you’re probably in luck: Crowdsourced apps like Yelp can help you find food in a pinch. But what if you’re a bighorn sheep? A new study shows how these grazers get food on the hoof—even as their “restaurants” shift from location to location.Each spring, a green wave of plants rolls over the world’s temperate zones, as new growth pops up from south to north—and from lower to higher elevations. Biologists have long debated whether the following herds of grazers are born with these migration maps built into their brains or whether they have to learn the route from the rest of the herd.To find out, scientists studied the seasonal movements of three groups of grazers: bighorn sheep that had been in the same location for centuries, sheep and moose that had been relocated to their current grazing grounds between 10 and 110 years earlier, and sheep that had just recently been moved to a new grazing location. The researchers outfitted them with GPS collars and followed their movements as they migrated, comparing them to the richness of the vegetation along their routes, as measured by satellite data. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe They found that the first group excelled at following the green wave of new growth. Sheep and moose in the second group had varying levels of success. And animals in the third group didn’t migrate at all, but ate what they could where they were.It was the movements of the second group that were the most telling: The longer the sheep or moose had been at these new locations, the better they became at following the green wave, the researchers report today in Science.The researchers also found that other factors, such as crowding, habitat loss, or increased predation did not strongly affect the tendency to migrate, suggesting that knowledge alone, either learned from others or gained by experience, helped the sheep take advantage of new growth. That suggests culture plays a vital role in how grazers find food, and that once such knowledge is lost—unlike old Yelp reviews—it may take decades to resurface.center_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email By Elizabeth PennisiSep. 6, 2018 , 2:00 PMlast_img read more

First marsquake detected by NASAs InSight mission

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first_img Email Mars is shaking. After several months of apprehensive waiting on a quiet surface, NASA’s InSight lander has registered a sweet, small sound: the first marsquake ever recorded. On 6 April, the lander’s seismometer detected its first verifiable quake, NASA and its European partners announced today.The quake is tiny, so small that it would never be detected on Earth amid the background thrum of waves and wind. But Mars is dead quiet, allowing the lander’s sensitive seismometer to pick up the signal, which resembles similar surface ripples detected traveling through the moon’s surface after moonquakes. The quake is so small that scientists were unable to detect any waves tied to it that passed through the martian interior, defying efforts to estimate its exact location and strength, says Philippe Lognonné, a planetary seismologist at Paris Diderot University who leads the mission’s seismometer experiment. Still, it was gratifying to observe, he says. “It is the first quake. All the time, we were waiting for this.”The detection is a milestone for the $816 million lander, kicking off a new field of “martian seismology,” added Bruce Banerdt, InSight’s principal investigator and a geophysicist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, in a news release. It proves Mars is seismologically active, and marks NASA’s return to planetary seismology after more than 4 decades. The mission is intended to peer through the planet’s rust-colored shell, gauging the thickness and composition of its crust, mantle, and core. But while on Earth, the lander was plagued by delay and cost overruns; since landing on Mars in a sand-filled hollow, the lander’s second instrument, a heat probe, got stuck soon after it began to burrow into the surface. While listening for quakes, InSight’s seismometer has had another pressing engagement, serving as a diagnostic tool for the stuck heat probe. Engineers at JPL and the German Aerospace Center in Darmstadt, which designed and built the instrument, have spent several rounds tapping the probe’s rod with a tungsten hammer at its tip and using the seismometer to listen to the noise, hoping to understand the ground the heat probe is trapped in. It’s possible the probe’s rod is stuck in gravel, but the sandy ground could also not be providing enough friction for the probe to gain traction. Testing is continuing, with JPL’s engineers seeing whether a nudge from the lander’s robotic arm might help.Meanwhile, this marsquake detection is just the start. As the lander’s 2-year primary mission continues, larger and larger quakes will likely be detected, Lognonné says. These will ultimately allow InSight to peer beneath the planet’s surface. “We’re starting to have many small quakes,” he says. By the end of the mission, he hopes, “we’ll have a super big quake.” By Paul VoosenApr. 23, 2019 , 2:50 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country JPL-CALTECH/NASA Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe InSight’s seismometer is protected from wind and heat swings by a dome-shaped shield. First marsquake detected by NASA’s InSight mission Scientists had good reason to believe that Mars hosted such quakes even though it lacks plate tectonics, the force that drives most earthquakes. The moon suggested so: Seismometers deployed by the Apollo program had detected quakes caused by meteorite impacts, the solar-driven thermal expansion of its crust, and the gravitational tug of Earth. But the frequency was unknown. The InSight team estimated it might see one a month, but that number could be much higher or lower. And so, after deploying the volleyball-size seismometer and its shield in early February, the researchers waited. The seismometer was working well, they found: It was picking up background vibrations, called microseisms, in the martian surface that were induced by wind. But still, as the weeks ticked by, no quakes.The team now believes the seismometer needed time to settle on the surface. Week after week, background noise during martian nights has dropped. That allowed the 6 April detection and three other signals that could (or could not) be other marsquakes, detected on 14 March, 10 April, and 11 April. The 6 April quake is the only event to rise above minimum requirements set by the mission for detection, and it was observed by both the primary seismometer and a smaller, less sensitive sensor.The quake reminds Yosio Nakamura, a planetary seismologist at the University of Texas in Austin who worked on Apollo seismology, of what the seismometer that Apollo 11 brought to the moon revealed during its 3 weeks of operation. The quakes the device recorded were mysterious, and it wasn’t until NASA’s Apollo 15 team established a network of three seismometers that scientists realized that some of what Apollo 11 recorded had actually been quakes from the moon’s deep interior.“With a seismometer of better quality and better analysis techniques than what we had 50 years ago, I hope they can do better than what we did with the Apollo 11 data,” he says. “This may take a while, but we can wait.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Egypts former president Mohamed Morsi dies in court

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first_imgBy AP |Cairo | Published: June 17, 2019 10:03:40 pm Advertising Morsi, who hailed from Egypt’s largest Islamist group, the now outlawed Muslim Brotherhood, was elected president in 2012 in the country’s first free elections following the ouster the year before of longtime leader Hosni Mubarak.The military ousted Morsi in 2013 after massive protests and crushed the Brotherhood in a major crackdown, arresting Morsi and many others of the group’s leaders. Egypt, Mohammed Morsi, egypt violence, Egypt Mohammed Morsi, Mohammed Morsi prison, Mohammed Morsi, world news, indian express Egypt’s former president Mohammed Morsi. (File)Egypt’s state TV says the country’s ousted President Mohammed Morsi has collapsed during a court session and died. The state TV says the 67-year-old Morsi was attending a session Monday in his trial on espionage charges when he blacked out and then died. His body was taken to a hospital, it said. Egypt: Ousted president Mohammed Morsi sentenced to death over mass prison break during 2011 uprising Egypt court jails ousted president Mohammed Morsi over insulting judiciary 3 Comment(s) Related News Amid multitude of woes, Egypt leader says democracy is back last_img read more

The evolution of the spine fueled the rise of mammals—and human back

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first_img Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Elizabeth PennisiSep. 20, 2018 , 2:00 PM K. JONES ET AL., SCIENCE, 361, 6408 (2018) Run, climb, breathe deep. You might not connect those abilities to your backbone. In fact, mammals owe many of their capabilities to the complex structure of their spine, which has five distinct regions, each free to adopt specialized functions. In this week’s issue of Science, Harvard University vertebrate paleontologist Stephanie Pierce and postdoc Katrina Jones report an investigation of fossils from the dawn of mammals that shows how evolution built our versatile spine.”This is an important analysis,” says Richard Blob, a biomechanist at Clemson University in South Carolina. “It’s tackling a fundamental problem: the origins of animal construction.” And it shows how mammals ended up with a backbone that “can evolve in pieces and respond to different selective pressures at different places along the column,” says Emily Buchholtz, a vertebrate paleontologist at Wellesley College in Massachusetts.Biologists have long recognized distinct regions in the mammalian spine based on their vertebrae. For example, small cervical vertebrae make up the neck, thoracic vertebrae bear the ribs and support the chest, and the ribless, hefty lumbar vertebrae bring up the rear. In contrast, reptiles and amphibians have very uniform backbones. “All their vertebrae are essentially doing the same thing,” Pierce says. She and others assumed a regionalized spine was unique to mammals.center_img The evolution of the spine fueled the rise of mammals—and human back problems Distant mammal ancestors such as Dimetrodon (right) had three spine regions; a mouse (left) has five. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) But in 2015, a sophisticated statistical analysis of a snake spine and a look at the genetic programs controlling its development indicated this backbone, too, has very subtly defined regions. “The work showed that regions could be distinct even if they weren’t as different as in mammals,” says Christian Kammerer, a paleontologist at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh. The finding suggested a regionalized vertebral column evolved early in land animal history, even before the divergence of mammals and reptiles.To probe its origins, Pierce, Jones, and their colleagues scoured museums for fossils with complete backbones. Ultimately, they analyzed spines from 16 synapsids, creatures that lived 200 million to 300 million years ago and include distant and immediate predecessors to mammals. They used computerized tomography scanning to get high-resolution images and worked with paleontologist David Polly from Indiana University in Bloomington to precisely measure the shapes of the vertebrae and assess regionalization within each animal.The analysis uncovered a stepwise addition of regions. More distant ancestors of mammals, such as Dimetrodon, a large reptilelike synapsid with a giant sail on its back, had three regions, designated cervical, anterior dorsal, and posterior dorsal. The therapsids, creatures that just preceded mammals, had a fourth region, the pectoral. A fifth region, the lumbar, appeared after early, egg-laying mammals arose and is found today in placental and marsupial mammals.The work also pointed to factors driving the emergence of these distinct regions. The pectoral region, for example, appeared in the therapsids as they evolved longer forelimbs, positioned under the body rather than splayed to the sides. (Think of a dog’s legs compared with a lizard’s.) The limb changes would have required changes in the shoulder girdle and the vertebrae supporting it, resulting in a distinct region of the spine just behind the neck. The same set of changes also freed some shoulder muscles to evolve into a muscular diaphragm, which improved breathing and enabled mammals to have a higher metabolic rate, Buchholtz says.Over time, further decoupling led to the modular spine seen in mammals today, in which individual vertebrae can change without jeopardizing the function of the whole spine. As a result, different regions can “take on new forms and functions, so they can adapt to different environments,” Pierce says. Perhaps the most variable part of the spine has been the last to emerge: the lumbar region, which interacts with the pelvis and hind limbs.The cat family illustrates the benefits of the region’s evolutionary freedom. All cats look, well, catlike, but lions tend to keep their feet on the ground and hunt large prey, whereas clouded leopards live in trees, leaping on their quarry, and cheetahs chase down antelopes at high speeds. Paleontologists Marcela Randau and Anjali Goswami of the Natural History Museum in London did 3D analyses of 109 cat skeletons representing species with various hunting and living strategies. They compared the vertebrae within each species and between species, as well as the limbs, shoulders, pelvises, and skulls.In all these cats, most of the spine looks similar. Their lumbar regions have diversified, however, suggesting this region evolved independently of the rest of the spine and skeleton, Randau said last month at the second Joint Congress on Evolutionary Biology in Montpellier, France. The size and shape of the lumbar vertebrae vary depending on what the cat does best.”It’s the lumbar region that really allows mammals to do all sorts of different things,” Pierce says. On the downside, the more recently evolved parts of the back—the lumbar region in particular—are also the source of most back pain, Pierce says, so “maybe we also owe our ancestors for having back complications.”last_img read more

Four injured after gunman opens fire in San Franciscoarea shopping mall

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first_img Man behind San Francisco’s facial recognition ban is working on more — way more Related News Post Comment(s) San Francisco, San Francisco shooting, San Francisco mall shooting, US San Francisco, US gun laws, world news The shopping mall in San Bruno, located south of San Francisco, was closed after the gunfire, police said on Twitter.Two people were shot and two others hurt on Tuesday when at least one gunman opened fire at a mall in the San Francisco suburb of San Bruno before apparently fleeing on a nearby train, police said. Barberini said police were searching for one or possibly two gunmen who may have fled the scene by getting on a BART train headed for Oakland.The shopping mall in San Bruno, located south of San Francisco, was closed after the gunfire, police said on Twitter.The Bay Area Rapid Transit authority said one of its commuter stops was shut down as a precaution after the shooting Explained: The push for, and the pushback against, facial recognition technology San Francisco becomes first US city to ban e-cigarette sales Advertising Advertising Two people were taken to San Francisco General Hospital with gunshot wounds to their lower bodies in stable condition, San Bruno Police Chief Ed Barberini told reporters at a late-afternoon news conference.“It was a senseless act,” Barberini said, adding that opening fire in a crowded shopping mall near a Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) station showed a “true disregard for human life.”Two other people were treated at the scene for minor injuries they suffered in fleeing from the gunmen. By Reuters |San Francisco | Published: July 3, 2019 7:17:51 amlast_img read more

Major fire breaks out at power station in Moscow region

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first_img Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Post Comment(s) Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence Footage circulating on social media showed huge flames leaping into the sky at the facility. An eyewitness quoted by the RIA news agency said the flames were 50 metres high.Firefighters were on their way to the scene, Russian news agencies reported.More details to follow By Reuters |Moscow | Published: July 11, 2019 3:35:24 pm forest fire, mexican navy helicopter crash, helicopter crash, Mi 17 helicopter crash Footage circulating on social media showed huge flames leaping into the sky at the facility. (Representational)A major fire broke out at an electricity generating power station in the Moscow region on Thursday, the TASS news agency cited a source in the emergency services as saying. Advertising After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Top News last_img read more

Microsoft Unveils RealTime AI for Azure

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first_imgMicrosoft’s Project Brainwave Demo At Hot Chips, Microsoft demonstrated the Project Brainwave system ported to Intel’s 14nm Stratix 10 FPGA.It ran a gated recurrent unit (GRU) model five times larger than Resnet-50 with no batching, using Microsoft’s custom 8-bit floating point format (ms-fp8).It sustained 39.5 Tflops of data, running each request in under one millisecond.Microsoft will bring Project Brainwave to Azure users, complementing indirect access through services such as Bing.”This is a good place to start for many of Microsoft’s AI efforts,” said Ray Wang, principal analyst at Constellation Research.”What’s been visibly missing is a rich neural network. You can’t do machine learning or AI without one,” he told TechNewsWorld.Fraud detection, retail mass personalization at scale, dynamic pricing and insurance adjustment are among the businesses that would benefit from real-time AI, Wang noted. “FPGA is a way to add and apply dedicated task-specific computing power geared to deep neural nets to conventional cloud infrastructure,” said Doug Henschen, principal analyst at Constellation Research.”This makes it easier to develop for conventional server capacity and let the FPGAs provide the computing power necessary for AI workloads,” he told TechNewsWorld.Attaching high-performance FPGAs directly to Microsoft’s data center network lets DNNs be served as hardware microservices, calling them by a server with no software in the loop. This reduces latency and allows very high throughput.”Real-time AI is the eventual goal for the vast majority of projects,” said Rob Enderle, principal analyst at the Enderle Group.”AI should be able to move at the speed of thought, or it’ll just be an advanced script,” he told TechNewsWorld. Microsoft on Wednesday unveiled a new deep learning acceleration platform designed for real-time artificial intelligence, codenamed “Project Brainwave,” at Hot Chips 2017.The platform has three main layers:a high-performance, distributed system architecture; a hardware DNN (deep neural network) engine synthesized onto FPGAs (field programmable gate arrays); and a compiler and runtime for low-friction deployment of trained models. Richard Adhikari has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2008. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, mobile technologies, CRM, databases, software development, mainframe and mid-range computing, and application development. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including Information Week and Computerworld. He is the author of two books on client/server technology. Email Richard. Dealing With Competitors Project Brainwave’s Guts Project Brainwave uses a soft DNN processing unit, or DPU, synthesized onto commercially available programmable gate arrays. This lets it scale across a range of data types, with the desired data type being a synthesis-time decision.Microsoft’s soft DPUs combine the ASIC digital signal processing blocks on the FPGAs with the synthesizable logic to provide a greater and more optimized number of functional units.The DPUs use highly customized, narrow-precision data types defined by Microsoft, which increase performance without real losses in model accuracy. Research innovations can be incorporated into the hardware platform rapidly, typically in weeks.Project Brainwave incorporates a software stack supporting the Microsoft Cognitive Toolkit (MCTK) and Google’s Tensorflow. Support for other frameworks will be added later.Tensorflow is “the currently dominating machine learning technique,” said Holger Mueller, principal analyst at Constellation Research.”That buys Microsoft time to strengthen MCTK,” he told TechNewsWorld. AI in Real Time Most customers and technology partners that Constellation has spoken to have gone to the Google Cloud Platform using Tensorflow, Wang said.Google will be Microsoft’s biggest competitor at first, he predicted.”In the long run, it’ll be those with massive compute power that will lead AI,” Wang said, “such as Facebook, Alibaba, Tencent and Amazon.”The FPGA-based service “will likely be a popular and cost-effective option, but Microsoft will surely also offer GPU infrastructure options geared to AI as well,” Henschen remarked. “IBM and Google have both brought GPU compute power to their respective clouds.” Project Brainwave leverages the massive FPGA infrastructure from Project Catapult that Microsoft has been deploying in Azure and Bing over the past few years. last_img read more

Fish oil and vitamin D pills no guard against cancer or serious

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first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 12 2018A widely anticipated study has concluded that neither vitamin D nor fish oil supplements prevent cancer or serious heart-related problems in healthy older people, according to research presented Saturday at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions. Researchers defined serious heart problems as the combined rate of heart attacks, stroke and heart-related deaths.Although hundreds of studies of these supplements have been published over the years, the new clinical trial — a federally funded project involving nearly 26,000 people — is the strongest and most definitive examination yet, said Dr. Clifford Rosen, a senior scientist at the Maine Medical Center Research Institute who was not involved in the research.Doctors have been keenly interested in learning the supplements’ true value, given their tremendous popularity with patients. A 2017 study found that 26 percent of Americans age 60 and older take vitamin D supplements, while 22 percent take pills containing omega-3 fatty acids, a key ingredient in fish oil.The new study also suggests there’s no reason for people to undergo routine blood tests for vitamin D, said Rosen, who co-wrote an accompanying editorial. (Both were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.). That’s because the study found that patients’ vitamin D levels made no difference in their risk of cancer or serious heart issues, Rosen said. Even people who began the study with clear vitamin D deficiency got no benefit from taking the supplements, which provided 2,000 international units a day. This amount is equal to one or two of the vitamin D pills typically sold in stores.A recent Kaiser Health News story reported that vitamin D testing has become a huge business for commercial labs — and an enormous expense for taxpayers. Doctors ordered more than 10 million vitamin D tests for Medicare patients in 2016 — an increase of 547 percent since 2007 — at a cost of $365 million.”It’s time to stop it,” said Rosen of vitamin D testing. “There’s no justification.”Dr. JoAnn Manson, the study’s lead author, agrees that her results don’t support screening healthy people for vitamin D deficiency.But she doesn’t see her study as entirely negative.Manson notes that her team found no serious side effects from taking either fish oil or vitamin D supplements.”If you’re already taking fish oil or vitamin D, our results would not provide a clear reason to stop,” Manson said.Related StoriesLiving with advanced breast cancerCutting around 300 calories a day protects the heart even in svelte adultsNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerManson notes that a deeper look into the data suggested possible benefits.When researchers singled out heart attacks — rather than the rate of all serious heart problems combined — they saw that fish oil appeared to reduce heart attacks by 28 percent, Manson said. As for vitamin D, it appeared to reduce cancer deaths — although not cancer diagnoses — by 25 percent.But slicing the data into smaller segments — with fewer patients in each group — can produce unreliable results, said Dr. Barnett Kramer, director of the cancer prevention division at the National Cancer Institute. The links between fish oil and heart attacks — and vitamin D and cancer death — could be due to chance, Kramer said.Experts agree that vitamin D is important for bone health. Researchers didn’t report on its effect on bones in these papers, however. Instead, they looked at areas where vitamin D’s benefits haven’t been definitely proven, such as cancer and heart disease. Although preliminary studies have suggested vitamin D can prevent heart disease and cancer, more rigorous studies have disputed those findings.Manson and her colleagues plan to publish data on the supplements’ effects on other areas of health in coming months, including diabetes, memory and mental functioning, autoimmune disease, respiratory infections and depression.Consumers who want to reduce their risk of cancer and heart disease can follow other proven strategies.”People should continue to focus on known factors to reduce cancer and heart disease: Eat right, exercise, don’t smoke, control high blood pressure, take a statin if you are high risk,” said Dr. Alex Krist, a professor of family medicine and population health at Virginia Commonwealth University. This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.last_img read more

Green leafy vegetables may reduce risk of developing liver steatosis

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Source:https://ki.se/en/news/green-leafy-vegetables-may-prevent-liver-steatosis Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 17 2018A larger portion of green leafy vegetables in the diet may reduce the risk of developing liver steatosis, or fatty liver. In a study published in PNAS researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden show how a larger intake of inorganic nitrate, which occurs naturally in many types of vegetable, reduces accumulation of fat in the liver. There is currently no approved treatment for the disease, which can deteriorate into life-threatening conditions such as cirrhosis and liver cancer.Liver steatosis, or fatty liver, is a common liver disease that affects approximately 25 per cent of the population. The most important causes are overweight or high alcohol consumption and there is currently no medical treatment for the disease. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have now shown how a greater intake of inorganic nitrate can prevent the accumulation of fat in the liver.”When we supplemented with dietary nitrate to mice fed with a high-fat and sugar Western diet, we noticed a significantly lower proportion of fat in the liver,” says Mattias Carlström, Associate Professor at the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet.Their results were confirmed by using two different cell culture studies in human liver cells. Apart from a lower risk of steatosis, the researchers also observed reduction of blood pressure and improved insulin/glucose homeostasis in mice with type 2 diabetes.The research group’s focus is the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes through dietary changes and by other means. Previous studies have shown that dietary nitrate from vegetables enhances the efficiency of the mitochondria, the cell’s power-plant, which can improve physical endurance. It has also been shown that a higher intake of fruit and vegetables has a beneficial effect on cardiovascular function and on diabetes.Related StoriesLiver fat biomarker levels linked with metabolic health benefits of exercise, study findsNew findings offer pathway for fight against non-alcoholic fatty liver diseaseNovel biomarker-guided approach has potential for treatment of common liver cancer”We think that these diseases are connected by similar mechanisms, where oxidative stress causes compromised nitric oxide signalling, which has a detrimental impact on cardiometabolic functions,” says Dr Carlström. “We now demonstrate an alternative way to produce nitric oxide, where more nitrate in our diet can be converted to nitric oxide and other bioactive nitrogen species in our body.”Even though many clinical studies have been done, there is still considerable debate about what properties of vegetable make them healthy.”No one has yet focused on nitrate, which we think is the key,” continues Dr Carlström. “We now want to conduct clinical studies to investigate the therapeutic value of nitrate supplementation to reduce the risk of liver steatosis. The results could lead to the development of new pharmacological and nutritional approaches.”While larger clinical studies are needed to confirm the role of nitrate, the researchers can still advise on eating more green leafy vegetables, such as regular lettuce or the more nitrate-rich spinach and rocket.”And it doesn’t take huge amounts to obtain the protective effects we have observed – only about 200 grams per day,” says Dr Carlström.” Unfortunately, however, many people choose not to eat enough vegetables these days.” read more

New book series on antiobesity treatment strategies

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first_img Source:https://benthamscience.com/ Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 2 2019Obesity is a complex health problem, caused by a number of factors such as excessive food intake, lack of physical activity, genetic predisposition, endocrine disorders, medications and psychiatric illnesses. The incidence of obesity among populations in both the developing and the developed world has reached epidemic proportions. In response to this, efforts to control and treat obesity have also been vigorously pursued, ranging from activities focused on raising awareness about lifestyle changes to the discovery and development of safe and effective anti-obesity drugs. Anti-obesity Drug Discovery and Development is a book series focused on this very important area of healthcare research. Each volume presents insightful updates on pharmaceutical research and development for clinical researchers and healthcare professionals involved in obesity treatment programs.The fourth volume of this series is covers 6 reviews on anti-obesity treatment strategies including updates on obesity and cancer prevention through dietary modulation, the role of anti-obesity medications in polycystic ovary syndrome, potential anti-obesity strategies targeting mitochondria, calcium silicate based formulations for anti-obesity therapy, and the identification of obesity medications from natural products and plants.last_img read more